globular

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globular

(glŏb′ū-lăr) [L. globus, a globe]
Resembling a globe or globule; spherical.

globular

resembling a globe.

globular heart
a spherical cardiac silhouette, usually greatly enlarged and lacking the detailed outline of the right and left atria and apex. Characteristic of pericardial effusion and cardiomyopathy.
globular nematode
see tetrameresamericana.
References in periodicals archive ?
Globular star clusters are so dense, why don't they collapse in on themselves from their own gravity?
And yet, perhaps partly because of this, M2 looks more like a globular cluster and is a little more obvious in 10x50 binoculars than M15.
Radial chains are common in globulars, but the allure of M30 is that they trend strikingly in one direction.
This longer wavelength, invisible to the human eye, has a second benefit especially germane to assisted observing of globulars.
Globular clusters typically contain tens to hundreds of thousands of fiery suns.
Among globular clusters, the brightest stars have about the same luminosity, but their apparent magnitude largely depends on distance.
However, this globular displays one especially interesting feature--it's bisected by a north-south band of relatively bright stars.
The closest confirmed globular cluster is Messier 4, just 7,000 light-years from Earth.
Hercules is the constellation that spells "summer" for me, and Messier 13, the Great Globular Star Cluster, is undoubtedly Here's premiere deep-sky object.
The summer sky is where you'll find M22--and almost all the other bright globular star clusters visible from the Northern Hemisphere.
A group of globulars lies near M31's core: relatively easy G235 and G222; fairly difficult G230; and difficult G229, G257, G205, and G217.
Of all the various types of deep-sky objects, globular clusters routinely give beginning binocular observers the most unexpected difficulty.