globular protein


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

glob·u·lar pro·tein

any protein soluble in water, usually with added acid, alkali, salt, or ethanol, and roughly so classified (albumins, globulins, histones, and protamines), in contrast to fibrous protein.

glob·u·lar pro·tein

(globyū-lăr prōtēn)
Any protein soluble in water, usually with added acid, alkali, salt, or ethanol, and roughly so classified (albumins, globulins, histones, and protamines).

globular protein

Any protein readily soluble in a weak salt solution. GLOBULINS are globular proteins. Also known as eublobulins.

globular protein

a type of PROTEIN, folded and twisted into a tertiary structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Becu, "Quantitative analysis of confocal laser scanning microscopy images of heatset globular protein gels," Food Hydrocolloids, vol.
In natural states, proteins generally exist in two form fibrous proteins and globular proteins [138].
As to the stability issue for globular proteins under the impact of different additives, including RTILs, it can be adequately approached by the method of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) [4, 5, 8-11,13-17, 23-26].
As determined from the calibration curve obtained with globular protein standards, the expected adjusted [V.sub.R] for intact cTnT would be 20 mL.
Many globular proteins undergo conformation changes after they have absorbed the surface of a bubble promoting the formation of intermolecular protein-protein interactions; often occurring through hydrophobic and disulfide bonds.
Just as it is difficult to thread a needle with tightly bunched-up string, it is difficult for globular proteins to pass through membranes.
Atsushi, Thermostability and aliphatic index of globular proteins. J.
The 1962 Nobel Prize in chemistry went to John Kendrew and Max Perutz "for their studies of the structures of globular proteins." In the same year, the prize in physiology and medicine went to Francis Crick, James Watson, and Maurice Wilkins "for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nucleic acids and its significance for information transfer in living material
Their topics include what a polymer molecule looks like, polymers in nature, the physics of high elasticity, globular proteins and folding, the dynamics of polymer fluids, and the mathematics of fractals as complicated polymer structures.
The molecular backbones of globular proteins have an intricates structure.
We all know that whey protein is a mixture of globular proteins isolated from whey, the liquid material created as a byproduct of cheese production.
Nonglobular proteins are known to have a larger [R.sub.s] than globular proteins with a comparable relative molecular mass ([M.sub.r]), and cTnT is far from globular (2).