globalisation


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Related to globalisation: globalization, Anti globalisation

globalisation

A generic term for the process by which regional economies, societies and cultures become integrated through a global network of communication, transportation and trade.
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Globalisation 1.0 was pre-World War 1 globalisation, which was launched by a historic drop in trade costs when steam and other forms of mechanical power made it economical to consume goods made faraway.
Exploring the impact of globalisation on economic growth and development, Our World in Data said that globalisation has certainly been a key driver of unprecedented economic growth, leading to a world with much less poverty.
Jyrki Katainen, Vice-President for Jobs, Growth, Investment and Competitiveness, said: "Globalisation is a formidable force bringing benefits to Europe and the rest of the world but also many challenges.
* globalisation is/has been a grafted; a double-edged sword (3); more of a threat than an opportunity; controversial; a fact of life; good; good for business.
Another author Eric Toussaint, in Globalisation: 'Reality, Resistance & Alternatives', in the chapter entitled, 'Ideas for Alternatives' has discussed the issue of cancellation of debt, extra resources to finance development, and related issues, and proposed new development strategies.
(18.) Louise Amoore and Richard Dodgson, "Overturning Globalisation: Resisting the Teleological, Reclaiming the Political," Nero Political Economy 2, no.
The 'EquaTerra Globalisation Study', conducted by the Economist Intelligence Unit on behalf of EquaTerra and World 50, a knowledge sharing community for C-level executives, assessed in detail the perceptions of global competition and the challenges of expanding ones' global footprint, according to over 200 leading executives and senior managers from the Americas, Western Europe and the Asia Pacific.
Many critics of the globalisation process might beg to differ.
Mr Brown acknowledged that the public was "sceptical" about globalisation because of the perceived loss of jobs to overseas.
At a simple, dictionary level, globalisation is defined as "The act, process, or policy of making something worldwide in scope or application".
While chapter 12, contributed by Fustukian, Sethi and Zwi, addresses "Workers' health and safety in a globalizing world," chapter 13, contributed by Zwi, Fustukian and Sethi addresses "Globalisation, conflict and the humanitarian response."
Globalisation and history: Evolution of the nineteenth century Atlantic economy.