global aphasia


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aphasia

 [ah-fa´zhah]
a type of speech disorder consisting of a defect or loss of the power of expression by speech, writing, or signs, or of comprehension of spoken or written language, due to disease or injury of the brain centers, such as after stroke syndrome on the left side.
Patient Care. Aphasia is a complex phenomenon manifested in numerous ways. The recovery period is often very long, even months or years. Because communication is such a vital part of everyday living, loss of the ability to communicate with words, whether in speaking or writing, can profoundly affect the personality and behavior of a patient. Although aphasic persons usually require extensive treatment by specially trained speech patholigists or therapists, all persons concerned with the care of the patient should practice techniques that will help minimize frustration and improve communication with such patients.
amnestic aphasia anomic aphasia.
anomic aphasia inability to name objects, qualities, or conditions. Called also amnestic or nominal aphasia.
ataxic aphasia expressive aphasia.
auditory aphasia loss of ability to comprehend spoken language. Called also word deafness.
Broca's aphasia motor aphasia.
conduction aphasia aphasia due to a lesion of the pathway between the sensory and motor speech centers.
expressive aphasia motor aphasia.
fluent aphasia that in which speech is well articulated (usually 200 or more words per minute) and grammatically correct but is lacking in content and meaning.
global aphasia total aphasia involving all the functions that go to make up speech and communication.
jargon aphasia that with utterance of meaningless phrases, either neologisms or incoherently arranged known words.
mixed aphasia combined expressive and receptive aphasia.
motor aphasia aphasia in which there is impairment of the ability to speak and write, owing to a lesion in the insula and surrounding operculum including Broca's motor speech area. The patient understands written and spoken words but has difficulty uttering the words. See also receptive aphasia. Called also logaphasia and Broca's, expressive, or nonfluent aphasia.
nominal aphasia anomic aphasia.
nonfluent aphasia motor aphasia.
receptive aphasia inability to understand written, spoken, or tactile speech symbols, due to disease of the auditory and visual word centers, as in word blindness. See also motor aphasia. Called also logamnesia and sensory or Wernicke's aphasia.
sensory aphasia receptive aphasia.
visual aphasia alexia.
Wernicke's aphasia receptive aphasia.

glo·bal a·pha·si·a

in which all aspects of speech and communication are severely impaired. At best, patients can understand or speak only a few words or phrases; they can neither read nor write.

global aphasia

Total aphasia, see there.

glo·bal a·pha·si·a

(glō'băl ă-fā'zē-ă)
Disorder in which all aspects of speech and communication are severely impaired. At best, patients can understand or speak only a few words or phrases; they can neither read nor write.
Synonym(s): mixed aphasia, total aphasia.

Global aphasia

A condition characterized by either partial or total loss of the ability to communicate verbally or using written words as a result of widespread injury to the language areas of the brain. This condition may be caused by a stroke, head injury, brain tumor, or infection. The exact language abilities affected vary depending on the location and extent of injury.
Mentioned in: Aphasia
References in periodicals archive ?
All subjects were Italian and have global aphasia. Patients were excluded if they had bilateral lesions, previous stroke, previous drug abuse, and a positive history of psychiatric disorders or dementia (OMS, 1994).
of Patients Dysarthria 19 19.00% Motor aphasia 23 23.00% Sensory aphasia 4 4.00% Global aphasia 3 3.00% Cranial nerves VII 47 47.00% IX and X 3 3.00% VII, IX and X 2 2.00% Tone Increased 87 87.00% Decreased 6 6.00% Normal 7 7.00% Athetosis 2 2.00% Right Hemipariesis 52 52.00% Left Hemipariesis 40 40.00% Monopariesis left upper limb 2 2.00% Monopariesis right upper limb 2 2.00% Quadriparesis 1 1.00% Only aphasia 3 3.00% Sensory Impairment 6 6.00% Table 4: Association of Risk Factors According to Age of the Patients Total Age [less than Risk Factors n=100 or equal to] 44 yrs.
Knud suffers from moderate/severe dementia and global aphasia. The case material consists of:
Clinical symptoms were spastic hemiparesis on the right and both severe global aphasia and AOS.
The effect of remnant and pictographic books on the communicative interaction of individuals with global aphasia.
Recovery of semantic word processing in global aphasia: A functional MRI study.
has mild to moderate global aphasia, a right visual field cut, and a mild right pronator drift.
* Global aphasia results from severe and extensive damage to the language areas of the brain.
Here, we present the case of a patient with forgetfulness and global aphasia whose MRI was normal three months before presentation and who turned to have GBM.
In complete occlusion symptoms include contralateral gaze palsy, hemiplegia, hemisensory loss, spatial neglect and homonymous hemianopia.[4,8] Global aphasia is present with left hemisphere lesions.[4] Occlusion of the superior trunk of the middle cerebral artery will result in the following symptoms: contralateral hemiplegia and hemianesthesia in the face and arm with lesser involvement of the lower extremity, ipsilateral deviation of eyes and head, and Broca's aphasia (with dominant hemisphere occlusion).[4,8] Occlusion of the inferior trunk of the middle cerebral artery usually results in contralateral hemianopsia or upper quadrantanopia, Wernicke's aphasia (usually with left sided lesions) and left visual neglect (usually with right sided lesions).
evaluated 65 aphasia patients during the acute stage and reported a mean age of 55.1 for Broca's aphasia, 65.5 for Wernicke's aphasia, and 64.6 for global aphasia (14).

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