gliosis


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gliosis

 [gli-o´sis]
an excess of astroglia in damaged areas of the central nervous system.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

gli·o·sis

(glī-ō'sis),
Overgrowth of the astrocytes in an area of damage in the brain or spinal cord.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gliosis

Astrocytosis, astrogliosis Neuropathology An abnormal ↑ in astrocytes 2º to destruction of nearby neurons, typically due to ↓ glucose or O2
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gli·o·sis

(glī-ō'sis)
Overgrowth of the astrocytes in an area of damage in the brain or spinal cord.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

gliosis

Propagation (proliferation) of nerve connective tissue (neuroglia) in the brain or spinal cord. This may occur as a repair process or as a response to inflammation.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Hemosiderine deposits and gliosis area are detected in the malformations surroundings.
In this case, the CT finding of a midline cyst was originally thought to represent an isolated arachnoid cyst, but MRI demonstrated the callosal dysgenesis and associated grey matter dysplasia with gliosis in the adjacent white matter.
However, these subtypes share common histopathological changes, characterized by neuronal loss, gliosis and the presence of glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCI) with a-synuclein.5 In MSA-P the degenerative changes predominantly affect the basal ganglia, particularly the putamen seen as hyperintense rim at the putaminal edge, atrophy and hypointensity of putaminal body on T2WI while in MSA-C changes predominantly affect infratentorial structures like pons and cerebellum, seen as atrophy and hyperintense signals in pons, cerebellum and middle cerebellar peduncles with pontine hyperintensity (hot cross bun sign) on axial image,4 which was seen in both of our patient's MRI.
Significant improvement in gliosis and neuritic dystrophy was seen with this reversal in amyloid deposition.
It serves as the footplate of Muller cells, astrocytes, and fibroblasts, permitting adhesion and gliosis [10, 11].
This alteration was consistent with a malacic area of gliosis in the left temporal lobe and to a lesser extent in the left frontal lobe, in the corona radiata, and in the centrum semiovale.
SDT rats are characterized by DR that becomes established at about 20 weeks after diabetes onset and is followed by severe ocular complications including upregulated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), structural impairment of the neuroretina and gliosis, blood-retinal barrier leakage, and reduced electroretinogram (ERG) amplitude [5].
Inverted ILM flaps are useful for large FTMH because it has been hypothesised that if a segment of the ILM is left attached to the FTMH, it will provoke gliosis inside the retina and surface of the ILM as well as providing a scaffold for tissue proliferation [20-22].
The brain parenchyma shows diffuse gliosis and scant perivascular infiltrates comprised of histiocytes and lymphocytes.
At over 3 months postevent, brain MRI showed sequela of prior multifocal infarcts in the right cerebral hemisphere conforming to the R MCA vascular territory, with extensive multifocal encephalomalacia and gliosis. At over 6 months postevent, MRI showed stable sequela of multifocal infarcts in the R MCA territory.
Now (six months after admission time), he is completely healthy with normal echocardiogram and brain MRA except mild gliosis in MRI after AIS due to atypical KD.