glide

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glide

(glīd),
A smooth, or effortless, continuous movement.

glide

1. To move in a smooth, virtually frictionless manner.
2. Movement in a smooth, virtually frictionless manner.
3. A joint mobilization technique in which the clinician applies a force to move bones in a direction parallel to the treatment plane. This technique is used to maintain or increase joint play.
4. The smooth movement of acoustic frequencies, e.g., in audible speech.

mandibular glide

The movement of the mandible in any direction as the teeth come into contact.

glide

(glīd)
Smooth or effortless continuous movement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps we should cut right to the life-saving takeaway: If you're engine-out in a typical single and gliding into a headwind of 15 knots or more, pitching down to at least 10 knots over published best glide speed will probably extend your glide range.
This type of motion also carries the lateral malleolus posteriorly, through reciprocal action the fibula head glides anteriorly and superiorly.
Triangle Glides' Historic Oakwood tour is a 90-minute Segway excursion along the meandering pathways of the cemetery grounds during which guests hear about notable personalities from Raleigh's past.
All of the above mentioned studies, including the present study, are based on the assumption that launch and landing phases of the glides are of equal duration on short and long glides, and that there is no consistent difference in mid-glide speeds between short and long glides.
But during a glide, the flyer splays out its ribs and sucks in its belly.
Although generating your own polar would be informative and fun, that's not necessary to figure out in what condition your propeller should be during a glide. Try 1000-foot glides in both conditions, starting from an appropriate altitude, and see which one gives you results closer to your POH values.
The lower half of the presentation is a constant display of how far you can glide, the appropriate route to fly to the nearest airport and whether you have the altitude to make it.
Drill small holes for the glides' studs--slightly smaller is better than slightly bigger.
You don't need a table saw for this project, but it will help you zero in on more exact measurements, especially for the lower tray bases where accuracy is important for the ball-bearing drawer glides. The nail gun shown in the photos is also optional, but it makes assembly a lot faster and less tedious.
The glides are made of plain steel with zinc plating for durability.
Sets of repeat glides down a line are great for working on consistency in the glide.