gliadin

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gliadin

 [gli´ah-din]
a protein in wheat that contains the toxic factor associated with celiac disease.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

gli·a·din

(glī'ă-din),
A class of protein, separable from wheat and rye glutens; a member of the prolamins (proline-rich proteins), which are insoluble in water, absolute alcohol, and neutral solvents, but soluble in 50-90% alcohol.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gliadin

(glī′ə-dĭn)
n.
Any of several prolamin proteins present in wheat grains, and constituting a component of wheat gluten. Gliadins can cause celiac disease in susceptible individuals by inducing a destructive immune response in the small intestine.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

gli·a·din

(glī'ă-din)
A class of protein, separable from wheat and rye glutens, which contains up to 40% l-glutamine; a member of the prolamins, which are insoluble in water, absolute alcohol, and neutral solvents, but soluble in 50-90% alcohol.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

gliadin

One of the two main components of wheat protein and the one that contains the factor responsible for damaging the intestinal lining and causing COELIAC DISEASE.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005