glia


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glia

 [gli´ah]
neuroglia; the supporting structure of nervous tissue, consisting, in the central nervous system, of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia.

neu·rog·li·a

(nū-rog'lē-ă), This word is grammatically singular. Avoid the mispronunciation neurogli'a.
Nonneuronal cellular elements of the central and peripheral nervous system; formerly believed to be merely supporting cells but now thought to have important metabolic functions, in that they are invariably interposed between neurons and the blood vessels supplying the nervous system. In central nervous tissue they include oligodendroglia cells, astrocytes, ependymal cells, and microglia cells. The satellite cells of ganglia and the neurolemmal or Schwann cells around peripheral nerve fibers can be interpreted as the oligodendroglia cells of the peripheral nervous system.
Synonym(s): reticulum (2) [TA], glia, Kölliker reticulum
[neuro- + G. glia, glue]

glia

(gli´ah) neuroglia.

glia

(glē′ə, glī′ə)
n.

gli′al (glē′əl, glī′əl) adj.

glia

See neuroglia.

neu·rog·li·a

(nūr-og'lē-ă) [TA]
Nonneuronal cellular elements of the central and peripheral nervous system; thought to have important metabolic functions. In central nervous tissue they include oligodendroglia cells, astrocytes, ependymal cells, and microglia cells.
Synonym(s): glia, reticulum (2) .
[G. neuron, tendon, nerve, + glia, glue]

glia

or

neuroglia

the web of undifferentiated cells that packs and supports nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord.

glia

neuroglia; the supporting cells of the central nervous system, made up of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers hope to explore how the glia coordinate with each other without the benefit of hardwiring like motor neurons; perhaps they communicate with each other, or with the motor neurons.
Based on differences in mouse and human astrocytes, Nedergaard and colleagues wondered if inserting human glia into mice would change the way mouse brains worked.
These receptors include two glutamate receptors (NMDA and metabotropic of class H), and a nicotinic ACh autoreceptor, identified on the basis of voltage changes induced in periaxonal glia by neurophysiological stimulation of squid or crayfish giant axons, or by addition of agonists or antagonists of these receptors (7, 8).
It is now clear that neural impulse activity is detected by glia and purinergic signalling is emerging as a major means of integrating functional activity between neurons, glia and vascular cells in the nervous system.
In the case of the zebrafish, activation of Ascll essentially reprograms the glia into stem cells that can change to become all the cell types needed to repair the retina and restore sight.
identified EGR1 and FOS as novel candidate targets of Notch signaling in human, but not found in mouse, radial glia.
This study indicates that glia are not only essential to neural transmission, but also suggest that the development of human cognition may reflect the evolution of human-specific glial form and function," said University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) neurologist Steven Goldman, M.
A five-minute 'cameo' saw Del Rodney come on to give Adil Glia a rest, whilst both were nursing hamstring strains.
EZFit resident coach Dick and Adil Glia are licensed by The Football Association (FA) in England, and coach children between three and 15 years old.
We investigate neurovascular interactions in developing central nervous system, specifically examining the role that VEGF plays in regulating radial glia differentiation and developing pial blood vessels.
But new research indicates that some glia have important roles related to information processing and responding to the world.
Further supporting their potential for gene therapeutic applications, the secretory products from these NSCs can cross-correct a prototypical genetic metabolic defect in abnormal neurons and glia in vitro as effectively as do murine NSCs.