glenoid labrum


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gle·noid la·brum

(glē'noyd lā'brŭm)
Soft tissue lip around the periphery of the glenoid fossa that widens and deepens the shoulder joint to aid in the achievement of stability.
See also: acetabulum

glenoid labrum

The ring of fibrocartilaginous tissue around the glenoid cavity on the scapula. It deepens and increases the congruency of the articulating surface.
Synonym: glenoid ligament; glenoid lip
References in periodicals archive ?
The shape of the glenoid cavity and the glenoid labrum determines the most remarkable feature of the gleno-humeral joint as they precisely stabilizes the humeral head in the center of the cavity as well as allowing a vast range of movements (15).
MRI can also demonstrate soft tissue injuries such as the glenoid labrum and cartilage disruption.
McDonald couldn't have known it then, but the twinge and "clicking sensation" he felt in his shoulder was the start of a Glenoid labrum tear--a rip in the cuff of cartilage circling the shoulder socket.
The LHB plays an important functional role in glenohumeral stability, acting dynamically through the range of motion as well as via depression of the humeral head and serving as anchorage point of the superior glenoid labrum [3].
Mcleod, "Glenoid labrum tears related to the long head of the biceps," The American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol.
The long biceps tendon arises mainly from the supraglenoid tubercle and partly from the superior glenoid labrum, passes through the glenohumeral joint, and enters the intertubercular groove.
A magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) was requisitioned to identify the severity of damage to the glenoid labrum and to rule out any other intra-articular pathology.
The glenoid labrum is a bumper of cartilage that surrounds the shoulder joint and is pear-shaped.
Static stabilizers include the glenoid labrum and glenohumeral ligaments.
Various disorders or pathology may contribute towards this pain, such as subacromial impingement syndrome, rotator cuff pathology and/or lesions of the glenoid labrum (Feleus et al 2008).
The glenoid labrum deepens the shoulder cavity by up to 50% which increases concavity compression and, ultimately, joint stability.