glaucomatocyclitic

glau·co·ma·to·cy·clit·ic

(glaw-kō'mă-tō-si-klit'ik),
Denoting increased intraocular pressure associated with evidences of cyclitis.
See also: glaucomatocyclitic crisis.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Gonnermann et al., "Trabeculectomy ab interno (trabectome): yet another possibility in the treatment of uncontrolled glaucomatocyclitic crisis under systemic valganciclovir therapy?" Eye (London, England), vol.
Glaucomatocyclitic crisis, also known as the Posner-Schlossman syndrome (PSS), is a self-limiting, rare disease that was first described by Posner and Schlossman in 1948 [1].
In this article, we present several cases of glaucomatocyclitic crises with narrow or closed angles.
We retrospectively collected data from patients who were diagnosed with glaucomatocyclitic crises and a shallow anterior chamber at the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital over a twenty-one-year period from 1995 to 2016.
These patients had at least one typical unilateral ocular hypertensive episode that fulfilled the criteria of glaucomatocyclitic crisis (Table 2, Figures 1 and 2) without the angle feature.
Glaucomatocyclitic crisis was first reported and described by Posner and Schlossman decades ago [1, 3].
established a positive association between glaucomatocyclitic crisis and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in an observation of eleven patients.
Therefore, it is reasonable that glaucomatocyclitic episodes occur in Asian patients with narrow angles.
Based on our clinical observation, it is possible for patients with narrow or closed angles to have glaucomatocyclitic crises, which is different from the primary feature described by Posner and Schlossman.
To the best of our knowledge, this case series is the first to present glaucomatocyclitic crisis episodes in individuals with a narrow angle/angle closure.
Schlossman, "Further observations on the syndrome of glaucomatocyclitic crises," Transactions American Academy of Ophthalmology, vol.
Green, "Posner-Schlossman syndrome (glaucomatocyclitic crisis)," Clinical & Experimental Optometry, vol.