glassy cell carcinoma

glassy cell carcinoma

A malignancy that comprises 1.2% of primary cervical cancers; it is an aggressive, poorly differentiated adenosquamous carcinoma, and arises in subcylindric reserve cells.

Clinical findings
Glassy cell carcinomas affect younger women than those affected by more common cervical carcinoma, and are often associated with pregnancy.

Prognosis
Poor; 5-year survival: 25%.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Rare, and infrequently reported variants of EC include hepatoid carcinoma, glassy cell carcinoma, lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma, adenocarcinoma with trophoblastic differentiation, and giant cell carcinoma (GCC) (3).
Adjuvant combined paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy for glassy cell carcinoma of theuterine cervix: report of three cases with clinicopathological analysis.
Glassy cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix: histochemical, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic observations.
Glassy cell carcinoma of the cervix: cytologic features and expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and Her2/neu protein.
Conservatively treated glassy cell carcinoma of the cervix.
Glassy cell carcinoma of the cervix: a literature review.
Glassy cell carcinoma (GCC) was originally described in the cervix by Glucksmann and Cherry[1] in 1956, and it was considered to be an aggressive tumor and highly resistant to radiation therapy.
Glassy cell carcinoma is a rare neoplasm that occurs in various sites, such as the cervix, endometrium, fallopian tubes, and colon, with the uterine cervix being the most frequent location.
Glassy cell carcinoma of the endometrium responsive to megestrol acetate.