glassy

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glassy

Hyaline; vitreous; glasslike, smooth, and shiny.
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References in periodicals archive ?
When Henry Glassie recorded Theresa Rooney's 1972 singing of "The Wild Rapparee" in County Fermanagh, he was aware that rapparee stories and songs were performed as thinly veiled commentaries on the just cause of the IRA in post-partition Northern Ireland (personal communication, 2/28/96).
Glassie is a partner in the Nonprofit Organizations Practice at the law firm of Shaw Pittman, Washington, D.C., and author of International Legal I Issues for Nonprofit Organizations (1999, ASAE Publishing).
Glassie and witnesses from 13 other organizations represented at the hearing focused on the exempt organization community's opposition to the IRS exclusive provider provisions.
(29) Thus, the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship, Glassie spent time on the Irish border recording conversations with former members of mummers' play teams who had performed their plays in local houses at Christmas.
Many people understand the concept of traditional as standing in contrasr to innovative or modern, but in fact, as folklorist Henry Glassie has so eloquently explained, tradition is simply "the creation of the future out of the past." (3) Tradirion, therefore, actually involves a fair amount of innovation--taking something from one context and putting it to a new use in another.
specially in the celidh which folklorist Henry Glassie, in 1979,
Yet this irritated the newly independent-minded students of folklife or "folk culture" who viewed the scope of the field more broadly to include ethnological concerns of social and material culture (Foster 1953; Glassie 1968; Yoder 1963).
When I fish with Guide Tony Roach, who often pitches and rips a #7 Glow Yellow Perch Jigging Rapala, I might fish a Northland Puppet Minnow, a River2Sea Glassie Vibe, or a Sebile Spin Shad.
Jefferson Glassie is a nonprofit organization lawyer in Washington, DC, and the author of Heaven is Everywhere, and other various legal and inquiring books.
Buildings are created by culture, they cannot be perceived outside economic, political and religious context (Glassie 1992, 57).