x-ray

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x-ray

(eks'rā),
1. The ionizing electromagnetic radiation emitted from a highly evacuated tube, resulting from the excitation of the inner orbital electrons by the bombardment of the target anode with a stream of electrons from a heated cathode. Synonym(s): roentgen ray Compare: glass rays, indirect rays.
2. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation produced by the excitation of the inner orbital electrons of an atom by other processes, such as nuclear delay and its sequelae.
3. Synonym(s): radiograph

x-ray

or

X-ray

(ĕks′rā′)
n. or x ray or X ray
1.
a. A photon of electromagnetic radiation of very short wavelength, ranging from about 10 down to 0.01 nanometers, and very high energy, ranging from about 100 up to 100,000 electron volts.
b. often x-rays or X-rays A narrow beam of such photons. X-rays are used for their penetrating power in radiography, radiology, radiotherapy, and scientific research. Also called roentgen ray.
2.
a. A photograph taken with x-rays.
b. The act or process of taking such a photograph: Did the patient move during the x-ray?
tr.v. x-rayed, x-raying, x-rays or X-rayed or X-raying or X-rays
1. To irradiate with x-rays.
2. To photograph with x-rays.

X-ray

High-energy radiation A range of the electromagnetic spectrum used in low doses to diagnose disease and in high doses to treat CA. See Soft X-rays.
X-ray exposure
Diagnostic x-rays Impart 30-150 keV of energy; rare reports vaguely suggest a relationship between exposure to low- level X-rays and a slight ↑ in myeloproliferative disorders and a minimal ↑ risk for developing myeloma
Therapeutic x-rays
• Low level radiation, eg 5-10 keV or 'grenz' radiation–may be used to treat recalcitrant skin conditions–eg, psoriasis
• High level radiation, eg megaelectron-volt–MeV) radiation–may be used to treat internal malignancy

x-ray

()
1. The ionizing electromagnetic radiation emitted from a highly evacuated tube, resulting from the excitation of the inner orbital electrons by the bombardment of the target anode with a stream of electrons from a heated cathode.
2. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation produced by the excitation of the inner orbital electrons of an atom by other processes, such as nuclear delay and its sequelae.
3. A radiograph.
Synonym(s): roentgen ray.

X-ray

A form of electromagnetic radiation produced when a beam of high-speed electrons, accelerated by a high voltage, strikes a metal, such as copper or tungsten. X-radiation penetrates matter to a degree depending on the voltage used to produce it and the density of the matter. It acts on normal photographic film in much the same way as does visible light, but can also produce an image on a fluorescing screen. These properties make X-radiation valuable in medical diagnosis. X-rays are damaging to tissue, especially rapidly reproducing tissues, and can be used to treat various cancers (see RADIOTHERAPY).

X-ray

an ionizing radiation that is a powerful MUTAGEN with wavelengths between 10–1 and 10 nm on the ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM. X-rays are produced by bombarding a metallic target with fast electrons in a vacuum, and are capable of penetrating various thicknesses of solids. Having passed through a solid they can act on a photographic plate producing a light/shade pattern indicative of the solid structure.

Roentgen,

Wilhelm K., German physicist and Nobel laureate, 1845-1923.
roentgen - the international unit of exposure dose for x-rays or gamma rays.
roentgen ray - Synonym(s): x-ray
roentgenograph - Synonym(s): radiograph

x-ray

()
1. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation emitted from a highly evacuated tube, resulting from excitation of inner orbital electrons by bombardment of the target anode with a stream of electrons from a heated cathode.
2. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation produced by the excitation of the inner orbital electrons of an atom by other processes, such as nuclear delay and its sequelae.
3. Synonym(s): radiograph.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using patented, oil immersion technology for enhanced optical resolution, FlowCam Nano from Fluid Imaging Technologies automatically reveals protein agglomerates, silicon oil droplets, glass shards and other opaque, transparent and translucent sub-visible particles with the high resolution imagery needed for identification.
Speak of the glass shards that served as the bread crumbs
Its roof had been ripped off and glass shards covered the southbound carriageway, which was shut for eight-and-a-half hours after the 4.30am smash.
What makes this project so special, though, is that Nour Buhaisi, Aya Abu Hashish, Rahma Ashour, and Angham Elmadhoun not only created concrete twice as strong as the regular stuff, but also did so by reusing rubble and leftover glass shards.
Some of the wounded were hit by glass shards broken by the bullets, and some were wounded from the chaos that broke out, a volunteer paramedic said.
Retired mine worker SE-leyman Bayram, who was stuck by the glass shards, broken by the effect of explosion, was injured.
Hill demonstrates the large plate glass shards which were dumped in the alley, behind a house where young children play.
Morgan discovers small glass shards at the crime scene, and the connection is soon made to a new kind pool game becoming popular in LA - so the team visits an exclusive club where Turelli used to T work, managed by Elise Massey (Osbourne), and they learn that there is more going on behind the scenes than meets the eye.
Morgan discovers small glass shards at the crime scene and the connection is soon made to a new kind pool game becoming popular in LA - so the team visits an exclusive club where Turelli used to work, managed by Elise Massey (Osbourne) - and they learn that there is more going on behind the scenes than meets the eye.
There was blood all over and I was completely covered with glass shards. My legs were crushed and the skin and muscle were flayed open to the bone in many places," recalled Purvi who was preparing for her final year ICAi (The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India) exam, when the accident took place.
The east-facing facade of undulating bricks sits in contrast to the geometrically challenging glass shards of the west facade.