glabrous


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Related to glabrous: glaucous

glabrous

 [gla´brus]
smooth and bare.

gla·brous

, glabrate (glā'brŭs, glā'brāt),
Smooth or hairless; denoting areas of the body where hair does not normally grow, that is, palms or soles.
[L. glaber, smooth]

glabrous

(glā′brəs)
adj.
Having no hairs or pubescence; smooth: glabrous leaves.

gla′brous·ness n.

gla·brous

, glabrate (glā'brŭs, -brāt)
Smooth or hairless; denoting areas of the body where hair does not normally grow, i.e., palms or soles.
[L. glaber, smooth]

glabrous

Smooth. The term is applied to a hairless surface.

glabrous

(of plant structures) without hairs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Elytron 2.4x longer than wide, with shallow punctures along the striae, and the interstriae weakly rugo-punctate, mostly glabrous, with a few scattered short setae near posterior borders.
Inflorescences borne in pairs on older stems axillary to scars of shed leaves, never in axils of current leaves; pseudoracemes 10-16 cm long with the slender axis sericeous, without vegetative leaves below the flowers, the flowers 16-34 or more, borne proximally in pairs but distally in no consistent arrangement; proximal bracts 3-4 mm long, distal bracts 1.5-2 mm long, triangular, abaxially sericeous, adaxially glabrous, all eglandular; proximal peduncles 2-4 mm long, distal peduncles 1-1.5 mm long, sericeous; bracteoles ca.
Leaves clustered near the median part of the stem; sessile to long-petiolate; blades ovate, obovate, three-lobed, palmately, pinnately, or three-veined to subpalmately veined, margin dentate to serrate, glabrous to slightly pilose especially beneath.
Petals white, obovate or broadly ovate and glabrous. Stamens 20, shorter than petals.
These are glabrous and dichotomously branched with their first leaves depressed obovate, and with open dichotomous venation (Fig.
Character Descriptor and code 1 Growth habit Erect (2), semi-erect (4) and prostrate (6) 2 Flower colour White (1), purple (2) and pink (3) 3 Stem colour Green (1), pink (2), violet (3) and purple (4) 4 Stem hairiness Glabrous (1), weak/sparse (3), medium (5) and profuse (7) 5 Petiole colour Green (1), pink (2), violet (3) and purple (4), 6 Petiole hairiness Glabrous (1), weak/sparse (3), medium (5) and profuse (7) 7 Leaf colour Dark green (1) and light green (2), 8 Leafhairiness Glabrous (1), weak/sparse (3), medium (5) and profuse (7) Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO, 1995); numbers in brackets on the right-hand side are the corresponding descriptor codes listed in the FAO publication with modifications during the development of the list.
In the dermis, there are Ruffini endings and Pacinian corpuscles in a glabrous (or hairless) skin, whereas there is a complex combination of mechanoreceptors and their associated nerves and hair follicle receptors in a hairy skin [23, 24].