gizzard


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gizzard

(gĭz′ərd)
n.
1. A modified muscular pouch behind the stomach in the digestive tract of birds, having a thick lining and often containing ingested grit that aids in the breakdown of seeds before digestion.
2. A similar digestive organ found in certain invertebrates, such as the earthworm.

gizzard

a portion of the anterior part of the alimentary canal where food materials are broken up prior to digestion. Usually the gizzard possesses strong muscular walls and in invertebrates has internal projections. In some birds, such as the curlew, the gizzard lining is regularly renewed and the old lining cast out in the form of a pellet.
References in periodicals archive ?
2003 Direct and indirect effects of gizzard shad on bluegill growth and population size structure.
Diagnostic characters for Tritogenia were limited to those observed only in sulcata, with the location of the gizzard erroneously given as being in 7.
We found evidence in the gizzards of partially digested crabapple seeds and it is possible these robins may have been exposed to cyanide.
The samples of the liver, gizzards, muscles and also the feed were prepared by wet digestion.
The mean percent yields for gizzards of birds from the different farms (Table 3), farms A, B, C and D (Tables 4 to 7) were found to be significantly different (p< 0.05).
The treatments included gizzard shad and formulated bait from the same containers (lots) of bait used in the bait-type trial.
Among the remaining three guilds, the planktivores (within which the anadromous Alosa spp., mainly filter feeders, were not included) were the most [sup.13]C-enriched, driven largely by the migratory and filter-feeing gizzard shad (Jenkins and Burkhead, 1993).
Gobies and gizzard shad make up the main menu here.
Abstract: The feeding ecology of Turdus pelios was studied from field observations and gizzard contents.
with a festival and "Freeze Yer Gizzard Blizzard Run," billed as the country's coldest 10K.
Then, if he's lucky--and that scuttling minutiae of skin and innards, its hot pulse hammering, isn't--he will settle there and take in what's happened: severing the head first, then ripping the bright red strings that keep the blood in check, then eyes, gizzard, heart, and so to the bones, cracking and snapping each one--that moved so swift and silent and sure of itself, only a minute ago, in the sheltering grass.