ginseng


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to ginseng: American ginseng

gin·seng

(jin'seng),
The roots of several species of Panax (family Araliaceae), esteemed as of great medicinal virtue by the Chinese, used extensively as a "nutriceutical"; alleged to improve mental and physical functions.
[Ch.]

ginseng

(jĭn′sĕng′)
n.
1. Any of several plants of the genus Panax, especially P. ginseng of East Asia or P. quinquefolius of North America, having small greenish flowers grouped in umbels, palmately compound leaves, and forked roots used in herbal medicine.
2. The roots or preparations of the roots of any of these plants.
Alternative medicine An herb used as a herbal remedy, as an anxiolytic and antidepressant
Chinese medicine Any of 22 different deciduous plants, mostly of the Panax family—e.g., Panax ginseng—that are native to Southeast Asia; ginseng root contains panaxin, panax acid, panaquilen, panacen, sapogenin, and ginsenin; it is used in Chinese herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative, and said to have immunologic, hormonal, and stress-reducing effects; it has been used for respiratory infections, gastrointestinal complaints including anorexia, bloating, depression, diarrhoea, vomiting, fatigue, impotence, shock, shortness of breath, stress, increased sweating
Physiologic effects Increased testosterone, corticosteroids, gluconeogenesis, central nervous system activity, increased pulse and blood pressure, gastrointestinal motility, haematopoiesis; decreased cholesterol
Toxicity Ginseng should not be used in patients with asthma, arrhythmias, hypertension, or post-menopausal bleeding
Fringe oncology Ginseng’s effect on cancer is inconclusive; weak data suggest it may have carcinoprotective effects. See Unproven methods for cancer management

ginseng

Pharmacognosy An herb used as a herbal remedy, as an anxiolytic and antidepressant Physiologic effects ↑ testosterone, corticosteroids, gluconeogenesis, CNS activity, HTN, ↑ pulse and BP, GI motility, hematopoiesis; ↓ cholesterol Toxicity Ginseng should not be used in Pts with asthma, arrhythmias, HTN, or post-menopausal bleeding. See Unproven methods for cancer management.

gin·seng

(jin'seng)
(Panax quinquefolius) Herbal with dozens of purported therapeutic properties (e.g., antidepressant, aphrodisiac, sleep aid, systemic panacea); used worldwide by enormous numbers of people.
[Ch.]

ginseng

The root of two perennial Chinese and Korean herbs of the genus Panax—P. quinquefolium or P. schinseng . Ginseng is credited with the power to cure many diseases including cancer, rheumatism and diabetes, and to have powerful aphrodisiac properties. There is no evidence that the herb has any medical or other value.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kim, "Cardiovascular diseases and panax ginseng: a review on molecular mechanisms and medical applications," Journal of Ginseng Research, vol.
Red ginseng powder (200 g) was extracted thrice with 2000 mL 70% ethanol for 3h (1h each time) to remove ethanol-soluble substances.
Patients received 160 mg/day ginkgo leaf extract, 1500 mg/day of Korean red ginseng root extract, or 3000 mg/day Korean red ginseng root extract for 4 weeks.
It was previously suggested that ginseng may improve physiological function and immunity, and exerts various pharmacological effects (Kiefer and Pantuso, 2003).
Editor's Note: As possible mechanisms for ginseng, Dr.
(2) Rich Inward took security over 5 billion shares of Hang Fat Ginseng held by a company controlled by Mr.
Administration of red ginseng extracts in healthy volunteers was not detected in plasma concentration.
One recent study (Saudi Journal of Biological Science, 2017) showed how the combination of Panax ginseng and bee pollen prevented BPH in laboratory rats genetically designed to develop BPH.
The result below showed that silymarin compared to ginseng had a better protective effect on the liver manifested by the presence of the SSs and the radial pattern of the hepatocytes on the picture below.