gingivitis


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Related to gingivitis: periodontitis

gingivitis

 [jin″jĭ-vi´tis]
inflammation of the gums. Bleeding is a primary symptom, and other symptoms include swelling, redness, pain, and difficulty in chewing. Gingivitis can lead to the more serious disorder known as periodontitis. There are numerous causes, of which the primary one is pathogenic microorganisms in the crevices between the gums and the teeth. Other contributing factors are general poor health, host response to inflammation, hormonal imbalances, malnutrition, reactions to certain medications, irregular teeth, badly fitting fillings or dentures that irritate the gums, systemic disease, and infections such as herpetic gingivostomatitis. Gingivitis is best prevented by correct brushing and flossing of the teeth and proper oral hygiene. A good diet containing the necessary minerals and vitamins is also important. Vitamin deficiencies and anemia and other blood dyscrasias are often accompanied by gingivitis.
acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (ANUG) (acute ulcerative gingivitis) necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.
Dilantin gingivitis generalized hyperplasia of the gingiva, which may also rarely involve other areas of the oral mucosa, resulting in overgrowth of the fibrous tissue from the interaction of plaque accumulation with the anticonvulsive agent Dilantin (phenytoin).
necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) an inflammatory destructive disease of the gingivae that has a sudden onset with periods of remission and exacerbation. It is marked by ulcers of the gingival papillae that become covered by sloughed tissue and circumscribed by linear erythema. Fetid breath, increased salivation, and spontaneous gingival hemorrhage are additional features. It may extend to other parts of the oral mucosa, with lesions involving the palate or pharynx (see also vincent's angina). The etiology is uncertain, but many authorities believe it is caused by a bacterial complex in the presence of predisposing factors such as preexisting gingival disease, smoking, severe stress, radical changes in eating or sleeping patterns, or nutritional deficiency. It has also been associated with immunodeficiency conditions such as infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Although the disease often occurs in an epidemic pattern, it has not been shown to be contagious. Called also acute necrotizing ulcerative or acute ulcerative gingivitis.
pregnancy gingivitis any of various gingival changes ranging from gingivitis to the so-called pregnancy tumor.
Vincent's gingivitis necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.

gin·gi·vi·tis

(jin'ji-vī'tis),
Inflammation of the gingiva as a response to bacterial plaque on adjacent teeth; characterized by erythema, edema, and fibrous enlargement of the gingiva without resorption of the underlying alveolar bone.
[gingiva + G. -itis, inflammation]

gingivitis

(jĭn′jə-vī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the gums, characterized by redness and swelling.

gingivitis

Oral surgery Inflammation of gingiva. See Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, Pregnancy gingivitis.

gin·gi·vi·tis

(jin'ji-vī'tis)
Inflammation of the gingiva with no apical migration of the junctional epithelium beyond the cementoenamel junction.
[gingiva + G. -itis, inflammation]

gingivitis

Inflammation of the gums. Gingivitis almost always implies neglect of dental hygiene with accumulation of PLAQUE around the necks of the teeth and the development of dental CALCULUS. There is inflammation and bleeding and, if the condition is neglected, damage to the PERIODONTAL MEMBRANE that secures the teeth in place. Gingivitis is also a feature of SCURVY.

gingivitis

inflammation of the gingiva or gums resulting from harmful bacteria triggering immune responses in the area around the teeth. Gingivitis is one of many periodontal diseases that affect the health of the periodontium (tissues surrounding the teeth including the gums, soft tissues and bone). The primary cause is Porphyromonas gingivalis, but other anaerobic bacteria and SPIROCHAETES may be involved. Normally, gingivitis results from an underlying illness or particular medication, such as steroid therapy, that renders the IMMUNE SYSTEM susceptible. Hormonal changes in the body during pregnancy and PUBERTY may also render gums vulnerable to bacterial infection. Whilst painful and unpleasant, the condition does not usually lead to TOOTH loss.

Gingivitis

Inflammation of the gums, seen as painless bleeding during brushing and flossing.
Mentioned in: Oral Hygiene

gin·gi·vi·tis

(jin'ji-vī'tis)
Inflammation of gingiva as a response to bacterial plaque on adjacent teeth; characterized by erythema, edema, and fibrous enlargement of the gingiva without resorption of the underlying alveolar bone.
[gingiva + G. -itis, inflammation]
References in periodicals archive ?
For bacterial dental plaque the Kappa value was 0.86 and for gingivitis, 0.88.
Mydel added that it is important if you have established gingivitis and have Alzheimer's in your family, to go to your dentist regularly and clean your teeth properly.
If not properly treated, gingivitis can advance to periodontitis.
Beyond brushing, interdental mechanical plaque control is an additional strategy for the treatment of gingivitis. Various interdental cleaning devices include dental floss, interdental brushes, and irrigators.
Conclusion: Most RA patients were positive for anti-CCP antibodies and presented with generalized gingivitis. Oral hygiene education should be reinforced in RA patients to prevent further progression of periodontal disease.
Crest Gum Detoxifys technology neutralizes plaque bacteria to help prevent gingivitis, even below the gum line.
The present study concluded that dental caries was prevalent in rural locality and gingivitis in urban locality.
Group I underwent routine periodontal treatment methods for streptococcal gingivitis, while a supportive treatment that involved an antacid chewing tablet two times a day for a week based on the microorganism's growth characteristics was used on patients in Group II.
This reduction is tied to an increase in oral-health disorders associated with xerostomia, including dental decay, gingivitis, tooth mobility, and halitosis.