gingival retraction


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Related to gingival retraction: Gingival recession

gin·gi·val re·trac·tion

1. lateral movement of the gingival margin away from the tooth surface; may be indicative of underlying inflammation or pocket formation;
2. displacement of the marginal gingivae away from the tooth by mechanical, chemical, or surgical means.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gin·gi·val re·trac·tion

(jinji-văl rĕ-trakshŭn)
1. Lateral movement of gingival margin away from tooth surface; may indicate underlying inflammation or pocket formation.
2. Displacement of marginal gingivae away from the tooth by mechanical, chemical, or surgical means.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A gingival retraction paste, Expasyl[R] (Acteon, Bordeaux, France), was applied (0.125 [cm.sup.3]) to three different areas on each implant: the collar (C), the junction of collar and microthread (JC) and the microthread (MT) itself, using a handgun applicator (Figure 1).
Achieving an accurate replication of the finishing margins for fixed prosthodontics requires adequate gingival retraction. Expasyl[R] is a retraction paste that provides this function.
Since it is the most coronal part of the implant, with initial and ongoing bone remodeling of the crestal peri-implant bone, this area is most likely to be in contact with Expasyl[R] during gingival retraction in clinical settings.
Gingival retraction cord with chemical was the choice for 91% specialists and by 16% general dental practitioners.
Clinical study of a newly developed injection type gingival retraction material.
With regard to gingival retraction, Dimashkich and Morgano2 reported that the use of the retractor wire was the most popular treatment in comparison to a shell.
Clinical evaluation of different gingival retraction cords.
Key Words: Gingival retraction, gingival displacement, retraction cord, tissue retraction materials.
Every practicing dentist needs to employ gingival retraction methods during routine dental procedures, especially when providing crowns with subgingival margins or when restoring cervical lesions on a tooth.
Key words: Gingival retraction, tissue displacement, gingival hemostasis, retraction cords, retrac-tion pastes, retraction gels
Though the necessity to place the finish line into the gingival sulcus obviously has a negative effect on the quality of the impression, aspects of gingival retraction have only been sparsely investigated.3-5 The aim of gingival retraction is to allow access for the impression material beyond the abutment margins and to create space for the impression material to be sufficiently thick.
The tooth surface was cleaned using slurry of pumice and gingival retraction was done to control the gingival crevicular fluid.