gingival mucosa

gin·gi·val mu·co·sa

that portion of the oral mucous membrane that covers and is attached to the necks of the teeth and the alveolar process of the jaws; demarcated from lining mucosa on the facial aspect by a clearly defined line that marks the mucogingival junction, and, in contrast to the lining mucosa, is keratinized and lighter in color; on the palatal surface, the gingiva blends imperceptibly with the palatal mucosa.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gin·gi·val mu·co·sa

(jinji-văl myū-kōsă)
Portion of oral mucous membrane that covers and is attached to necks of teeth and alveolar process of jaws; demarcated from lining mucosa on the facial aspect by a clearly defined line that marks mucogingival junction.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
There was preservation of the cortex of the maxillary sinus and maxillary alveolus (Figures 2, 3 and 5) as well as preserved integrity of the gingival mucosa which was best demonstrated on coronal T2 images (Figure 5) and confirmed on clinical examination.
Schwannoma Located in the Upper Gingival Mucosa: Case Report and Literature Review.
Moertel, "Hepatocellular carcinoma with metastasis to gingival mucosa: report of case," Journal of Oral Surgery, vol.
On closer examination, the lesion was noted to have multiple stalks attached to the gingival mucosa of the alveolar ridge on the maxilla; some of the stalks were noted to be pulsatile.
The various epithelial regions of the body such as palms, soles, knees, and keratinized oral gingival mucosa express cathepsin-C gene which explains the localization of lesions in PLS.
Lesion can arise on facial and lingual gingival mucosa. PGCGs tend to be asymptomatic; however, while pain is uncommon, the lesion may become ulcerated as a result of repeated trauma.
(2) This type of ameloblastoma cannot extend beyond the gingival mucosa into the alveolar bone.
Histological alterations in tissue sections obtained from diabetic patients were present in both the epithelium and the lamina propria of the gingival mucosa. The epithelium displayed variable amounts of acanthosis and parakeratosis, with reduced quantities of acute inflammatory infiltrate composed mostly of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (segmented granulocytes) throughout its thickness and in superficially located microabscesses.
Samples of gingival mucosa were used as a negative control for myofibroblasts (Figure 1E).
(1,3) Others, but less frequent locations for oral involvement, are the buccal and gingival mucosa. The lips, tongue, and palate are least common sites for oral involvement, (1,3) while 42% of case have multiple lesions at the same time.
The gingival mucosa was sutured in simple interrupted suture pattern using polyglycolic acid No.2 suture material avoiding dead space.