gingival cyst

gin·gi·val cyst

a cyst derived from remnants of the dental lamina situated in the attached gingiva, occasionally producing superficial erosion of the cortical plate of bone; most are located in the cuspid-premolar region.

gin·gi·val cyst

(jinji-văl sist)
Lesion derived from remnants of dental lamina situated in attached gingiva, occasionally producing superficial erosion of cortical plate of bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clear cells are characteristic cellular components of odontogenic cysts like lateral periodontal cyst and gingival cyst of the adult, or may occur in odontogenic tumors such as ameloblastoma, calcifying odontogenic cyst, and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor.
Cysts most commonly showing such epithelial theques are the gingival cyst of the adult, lateral periodontal cyst, botryoid odontogenic cyst, and sialodontogenic cyst [3].
Gingival cyst of adult is a rare odontogenic cyst from the rests of dental lamina [1].
(3) The differential diagnosis of these papules includes: gingival fibrous nodule, papilloma, focal epithelial hyperplasia, fibroma, gingival cyst, multiple hamartomas, and exostosis.
DC, dentigerous cyst; KOC, keratinizing odontogenic cyst; GC, gingival cyst; BOC, botryoid odontogenic cyst; LPC, lateral periodontal cyst; RadC, radicular cyst; and ResC, residual cyst.
(1) The lesions with similar morphology and color that one should consider in a differential diagnosis are fibroma, giant-cell fibroma, peripheral ossifying fibroma, gingival cyst of the adult, and exostoses.
A very small number of cases of calcifying odontogenic (0.7%) and glandular odontogenic (0.4%) cyst were also reported and not even a single case in this entire span was diagnosed as of eruption cyst, gingival cyst, lateral periodontal cyst or of buccal bifurcation cyst.
This study also showed that even palatal resolution occurs earlier than gingival cyst. This finding has not been mentioned in the literature before, whereas both types of cysts underwent spontaneous resolution by the first week of life (62.50%) and by the age of 8 months few (2.08%) of cysts continue to present.
Fine needle aspiration cytology and radiograph can exclude the differential diagnosis which are haemangioma, lipoma, soft tissue abscess,oral lymphangioma, benign and malignant salivary gland neoplasms, gingival cysts and pyogenic granulomas and can also exclude mucoepidermoid CA and adenoid cystic CA on the basis of histopathology.9 The aim of present study to highlight importance of the histopathological diagnosis in these common oral pathologies so as to properly manage them.
Developmental odontogenic cysts comprise of odontogenic keratocysts, dentigerous cysts, lateral periodontal cysts, sialo-odontogenic cysts, eruption and gingival cysts.1 The inflammatory type includes radicular/periapical, residual and paradental cysts.
The etiology of cystic jaw lesions has been traditionally divided into two types: developmental (e.g., dentigerous, keratotic, and gingival cysts) and inflammatory (e.g., radicular, residual, and paradental cysts).
The most prevalent odontogenic cyst was radicular cyst n=45(45%) followed by dentigerous cysts n=31(31%), odontogenic keratocysts n=14(14%), lateral periodontal cysts n=6(6%) and gingival cysts n=4(4%).