gill

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gill

(gĭl)
n.
Zoology The respiratory organ of most aquatic animals that obtain oxygen from water, consisting of a filamentous structure of vascular membranes across which dissolved gases are exchanged.

gilled adj.

gill

  1. the respiratory organ of aquatic animals. External gills, as in tadpoles, are produced by the embryonic ECTODERM; internal gills, as in fish, are developed from the pharynx and are thus endodermal (see ENDODERM). Gills are usually well supplied with blood vessels, and interchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide takes place across the extensive surface area (see COUNTERCURRENT EXCHANGE). Gills also occur in many invertebrates, for example, in insects such as the caddis fly larva and molluscs such as oysters. Occasionally, unusual structures act as gills, for example, the walls of the rectum in certain dragonfly nymphs, water being pumped in and out via the anus.
  2. the spore-carrying lamellae in basidiomycete fungi, located underneath the cap or ‘pileus’.
References in periodicals archive ?
(34.) Schachte, J.H.: Bacterial gill disease. In: A Guide to integrated fish health management in the Great Lakes Basin (Special publication).
Etiological and epizooto-logical factors associated with outbreaks of proliferative gill disease in channel catfish.
"I don't know that there's a connection between water for sucker fish that went to farmers and salmon 18 months later that died of a gill disease," Smith said.
Molecular tools are beginning to be used to probe Neoparamoeba strains associated with amoebic gill disease (Fiala & Dykova 2003, Wong et al.
She is on a 3+1 year contract treating salmon with hydrogen peroxide, a treatment for lice and amoebic gill disease. MS Molly is also used for mooring jobs in the salmon industry.
Gill disease was regarded as one factor in the elimination of the Portuguese oyster from important culture areas on the Atlantic coast of France (Comps 1988).