gill arch


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Related to gill arch: Gill raker

gill arch

(gĭl)
n.
1. One of several bony or cartilaginous arches located on either side of the pharynx and supporting the gills in fish and amphibians.
2. Embryology One of several corresponding arches in the embryo of a bird, reptile, or mammal that develop into structures of the ear and neck. In both senses also called branchial arch, pharyngeal arch.

gill arch

the cartilagenous skeleton supporting a GILL.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the branchial region these fishes all have paired symmetrical gill arch bones that support pharyngeal tooth plates, gill rakers and gill filaments (e.
Van Den Bosch (1984), Hovestadt and Hovestadt-Euler (2011), and Welton (2013) figure gill rakers from Recent Cetorhinus maximus, representing central through distal positions along the gill arch, from individuals of both sexes, and a range of body lengths.
Diagnosis: A species of Mogurnda with the following combination of characters: soft dorsal rays 11 or 12; soft anal rays 12 (rarely 11); pectoral rays 15-17, rarely 17; scales in lateral series 36-42; predorsal scales 21-25; rakers on lower limb of first gill arch usually 9 (80% of specimens with 8-9); body depth at pelvic origin 21.
Rakers in the first gill arch were short and lobular ranging in number from 9 to 14 elements, which suggest adaptation to capture larger preys (Table 1; Figure 3c).
Gill rakers modified, closely but irregularly set, mostly alternating (especially on gill arch one), often paired on the outer and inner sides of each gill arch (central part of arches two and throe); plates flattened, triangular, similar in shape to those in P.
Lower limb of the first gill arch with 36 to 40 (mode = 38) thin elongate gill rakers, closely approximated.
It differs from the Red Sea species in having 13-14 rakers (versus 16-18) on the first gill arch and several colour pattern differences.
The structure of the gill arch and gill filaments of Astyanax fasciatus and Cyanocharax alburnus shows the same pattern as in other teleosts.
The cleft between the parallel lines of buds and filaments also marked the location of the future gill arch (Figs.