gibbosity


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kyphosis

 [ki-fo´sis]
abnormally increased convex curvature of the thoracic spine as seen from the side; it may be the result of an acquired disease, an injury, or a congenital disorder or disease. It never develops from poor posture. One of the most common causes is postmenopausal osteoporosis accompanied by anterior vertebral body wedge-compression fractures. adj., adj kyphot´ic.

Kyphosis sometimes occurs with certain forms of poliomyelitis and with diseases that cause bone destruction, as happens in osteitis deformans (paget's disease). An injury, such as a fracture of the spine, treated improperly or not at all, may also result in hunchback. Some rare cases are caused by congenital deformities and diseases. One example, achondroplasia, or fetal rickets, is a congenital bone disorder that affects growth and bone formation. There are no specific symptoms besides back pain and increasing immobility of the spine. Symptoms vary with the cause, and any back pain or injury should be investigated.
Kyphosis. From Frazier et al., 1996.

gibbosity

(gĭ-bŏs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. gibbosi·ties
A rounded hump or protuberance.
References in periodicals archive ?
30 Face strongly projecting ventrally (not dorsally), giving a pointed, nose-like appearance in profile; mystacal macrosetae largely confined to small area at apex of pointed gibbosity Lycostommyia Oldroyd, 1980 (6 spp., Londt 1992a)
Corolla oblique in the calyx, yellow; cylindrical 3.5-3.7 cm long, constricted at the base 0.3 cm, 1 cm at the widest part in the upper half, constricted at the limb 0.7 cm; dorsally gibbous, gibbosity 0.4 x 0.5 cm; limb subactinomorphic slightly ampliate, lobes subequal 0.2-0.3 x 0.2 cm, deltoid apically obtuse or acute; outside pilose with 8-12 celled uniseriate hairs apically glandular, inside sparsely sericeous.
All Daspletis species possess (1) a facial swelling (gibbosity) that occupies about three-quarters of the face and is entirely setose (i.e.