giant platelet

A platelet that is larger than usual—e.g., the size of an RBC—a finding typical of Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS); up to 10% of normal platelets are ‘giant’—i.e., ‘squashed’ and oversized
DiffDx When > 20% of platelets are giant: idiopathic thromocytopaenic purpura (ITP), lymphoproliferative disorders, myeloproliferative disorders, reticulocytosis, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), systemic lupus (SLE), grey platelet syndrome, May-Hegglin anomaly, type 2B von Willebrand’s disease, thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura (TTP)

giant platelet

A platetet that is larger than usual, a finding typical of Bernard-Soulier syndrome–BSS; up to 10% of normal platelets are 'giant', ie 'squashed' and oversized; when > 20% of platelets are giant, other conditions must be considered in addition to BSS–eg, ITP, lympho- and myeloproliferative disorders, reticulocytosis, DIC, SLE, gray platelet syndrome, May-Hegglin anomaly, Montreal platelet syndrome, TTP
References in periodicals archive ?
Ristocetin aggregation will be abnormal in Bernard Souvelier Syndrome (Giant Platelet Syndrome).
Platelet-rich plasma is an artificial milieu deficient in giant platelet subspecies as well as erythrocytes and leukocytes, which are regarded as critical modulators of platelet function in vivo (15).
Inherited giant platelet disorders: classification and literature review.
However, platelet-rich plasma is an artificial milieu deficient in giant platelet subspecies as well as erythrocytes and leukocytes, which are regarded as critical modulators of platelet function in vivo (12).
(28) Giant platelet disorders also have characteristic electron microscopic findings.
Few disclaimers have to be considered while one interprets MPV in isolation: a spurious increase in MPV contributed by red blood cell fragmentation which can be counted by the analyzer as a giant platelet, a combination of hypoproductive and hyperdestructive thrombocytopenia and splenic sequestration; where large platelets are entrapped in spleen but not released into the circulation.
Increased bleeding after surgery or trauma may be difficult to control.7 BSS patients shows an increased bleeding time, decreased platelets count to near normal and presence of giant platelets on peripheral smear.
Automated haematology analysers produce erroneous results in the presence of particles of similar size and shape and in the presence of giant platelets and platelet clumps.
In platelets, the alterations were giant platelets, relative thrombocytosis, relative thrombocytopenia and platelet clumping.
His platelet count was 3,321,000/[micro]L (reference range: 140,000-400,000/[micro]L) and was described as giant platelets on peripheral smear.
Giant platelets were found in his peripheral blood smear and bone marrow aspiration showed elevated megakaryocytes with no evidence of hemophagocytosis.