giant cell tumor of tendon sheath


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gi·ant cell tu·mor of ten·don sheath

a nodule, possibly inflammatory in nature, arising commonly from the flexor sheath of the fingers and thumb; composed of fibrous tissue, lipid- and hemosiderin-containing macrophages, and multinucleated giant cells.

giant cell tumor of tendon sheath

Soft tissue tumors A potentially recurring lesion of the acral flexor tendon sheath which affects young Pts, is slightly more common in ♂, often with a long Hx, most common in the knee and ankle; GTTS is a variant of fibrous histiocytoma; it reaches a maximum of 3 mm, and may erode into bone. See Malignant giant cell tumor of tendon sheath.

gi·ant cell tu·mor of ten·don sheath

(jī'ănt sel tū'mŏr ten'dŏn shēth)
A nodule arising commonly from the flexor sheath of the fingers and thumb; composed of fibrous tissue, lipid- and hemosiderin-containing macrophages, and multinucleated giant cells.
Synonym(s): localized nodular tenosynovitis.

giant cell tumor of tendon sheath

A localized nodular tenosynovitis.
See also: tumor
References in periodicals archive ?
Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath is a slow-growing, benign tumor with a predilection for the dorsal surface of the finger near the distal interphalangeal joint in young to middle-aged adults.
Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath: spectrum of radiologic findings.
Recently, distinctive chromosomal aberrations have been described for PVNS and giant cell tumor of tendon sheath,[14-17] and a few case reports have indicated the potential for metastases.[18-23] These aggressive cases have generally been designated as malignant giant cell tumor of tendon sheath or malignant PVNS.[18-23] In general, these neoplasms had been present for several years before malignant degeneration occurred, and the patient died either following local recurrence or with pulmonary metastases.
A number of purported malignant giant cell tumors or examples of malignant PVNS have been documented in the English-language literature,[18-23] but many of these cases do not meet the criteria for diagnosis of malignant giant cell tumor of tendon sheath established by Enzinger and Weiss[25] or as modified by Bertoni et al.[23] Several of the reported malignant giant cell tumors most probably represent other types of sarcoma that contain a component of giant cells.[20,22] Enzinger and Weiss[25] require the coexistence of frankly maligmant areas with a typical benign giant cell tumor or a malignant-appearing recurrence following treatment of a typical benign giant cell tumor before they accept a lesion as a bona fide example of malignant giant cell tumor.