ghrelin


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to ghrelin: PYY

ghrel·in

(grel'in),
A naturally occurring 28-amino acid gut-brain growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP) that is expressed mainly in the stomach and possibly in the hypothalamus. Fasting and hypoglycemia increase ghrelin levels and circulating ghrelin levels are decreased in chronic obesity, following acute caloric intake and in states of positive energy balance. Acute administration of ghrelin to humans induces a feeling of hunger. Ghrelin binds to ghrelin-receptors in the anterior pituitary and possibly in the mediobasal and mediolateral hypothalamus to stimulate growth hormone release and to regulate energy homeostasis. Serum levels of ghrelin are measurably higher in patients who have lost weight through dietary measures.
[growth hormone release + -in]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ghrelin

(grĕl′ən)
n.
A hormone that is secreted by cells in the stomach and promotes hunger before an expected meal, decreases in amount after eating, and promotes secretion of growth hormone.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ghrel·in

(grel'in)
A peptide hormone secreted by endocrine cells in the gastrointestinal tract. Acts as a growth hormone secretagogue and as an orexigenic agent mediated by the hypothalamic hormones neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti growth-related peptide (AGRP).
[growth hormone release + -in]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ghrelin

A 28-amino acid peptide hormone that stimulates release of growth hormone from the anterior pituitary and has significant effects on appetite and energy balance. The main source of ghrelin is the epithelial cells of the fundus of the empty stomach. Recent studies have shown that, in mice, the hormone also interacts with the hippocampus and appears to improve memory and cognitive function.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Ghrelin

A recently discovered peptide hormone secreted by cells in the lining of the stomach. Ghrelin is important in appetite regulation and maintaining the body's energy balance.
Mentioned in: Obesity
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
There was a week positive correlation between ghrelin and age among multiparous women.
(27) However, the actions of GHRL on osteoclastogenesis are contradictory and it has even been postulated that the physiological effect of ghrelin on osteoclasts may be limited.
Following analyses were carried out: Ghrelin, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS) and oxidative stress index (OSI) levels.
The plasma ghrelin levels of the participants were measured by the ELISA method (Ghrelin ELISA kit, Tecan Sunrise 093002343, Hanzgzhou Eastbiopharm) in the venous blood samples obtained in the morning after a 12-h fasting period.
Therefore, the present investigation was aimed to assess the potential of ghrelin as a cardio protective agent in the induced MI of the animal model that epitomizes the experimental evaluation of cardio protective agents.
Volume equal to 1 [micro]g of total protein in precleaned UWS was assessed for resistin, visfatin, and ghrelin per using specific sandwich ELISA kits (item no.
In the present study, no difference in AG or unacylated (UAG) ghrelin levels were detected.
Inadequate sleep is associated with greater hunger from increased ghrelin and decreased levels of leptin, which is a hormone that suppresses appetite and signals the brain to stop eating.
Group I received ghrelin only while group II and III were administered intraperitoneally with both carboplatin and 5-flurouracil with and without rat ghrelin.
Ghrelin is a gut-derived hormone synthesized and secreted by the abomasal and ruminai tissues in ungulates (Hayashida et al.