gesture

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gesture

 [jes´cher]
an act made or something said to signify intention or attitude.
suicidal gesture a more serious warning than a suicide threat; it may be followed by a planned suicidal act that attracts attention without seriously injuring the subject.

ges·ture

(jes'chŭr),
1. Any movement expressive of an idea, opinion, or emotion.
2. An act.
[L. gestus, movement, gesture]

gesture

1. A body movement that helps to express or conceal thoughts or emphasize speech. See: body language
2. An act, written or spoken, to indicate a feeling.
References in periodicals archive ?
Through these data, participant viewing patterns while viewing weathercasts as a function of the presence or absence of gesturing by the weathercaster were identified and compared.
Ultimately, the eye tracking data recorded differences in participants' overt visual attention to weathercast components as impacted by gesturing of the weathercaster.
Softkinetic has turned 3-D gesturing into an art form for ambitious application developers, who have moved beyond the first-person shooter.
The latest wave of 3-D gesturing games tackles another health-related issue: fitness.
Babies often wave their arms about, but the gestures taken as pointing, which develop from a series of showing and reaching hand movements, are recognised as such because they are more clearly intentional; and, like adult gesturing, are often aligned with accompanying vocalic production and a checking that the audience is attending (Butterworth, 2003).
Secondly, gesturing has been explicitly introduced into language teaching and learning to aid the development of mastery.
The elements of likeability and dynamism are relatively close proximity (between 2 and 6 feet), positive facial expressions and micro-expressions, leaning toward others, a parallel orientation, moderate physical contact (as appropriate for the situation), eye contact about half the time, a moderate amount of gesturing (particularly to help the listener understand), a voice that is relaxed, not nasal or monotonic but vocally animated, and the absence of adapters.
Krauss (1998) reported a high rate of gesturing activity on spatial prepositions such as "under" and "adjacent" but also on terms such as "spin" or "cube." We distinguished among four different types of terms or referents: (a) spatial location terms, which describe the orientation or topography of an object in space, such as "under" and "on"; (b) spatial property terms, which describe the shape or form of an object, such as "square" and "short"; (c) manipulation/movement terms, which describe the motion or manipulation of an object, such as "open" and "hold"; and (d) nonspatial terms, which describe nondynamic characteristics of an object, such as "color" and "warm."
If one considers the broader context here, there is no real evidence that gesturing facilities lexical access.
The animal that viewed the scratching display usually began to groom the indicated spot, even if he was already grooming another part of the gesturing chimp.
The researchers then tested their analysis by examining what the gesturing ape did when the response to its gesture did not match the gesture's meaning, as deduced by the goal-outcome matching method.
This process may be the mechanism by which gesturing influences learning," said Goldin-Meadow.