germ warfare


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germ warfare

n.
The use of injurious microorganisms, such as bacteria or viruses, as weapons in warfare.
A hypothetical military technique that could be used by either nations or non-governmental bodies—e.g., the use of pathogens—viruses, bacteria, other disease-causing biological agents, or the toxins produced by them as biological weapons
References in periodicals archive ?
Records of Enoch's bombing missions over North Korea were removed by US air force investigators from the official records in March 1952 andndash; two months after he was captured and one week before he made his confession to "germ warfare".
But the germ warfare team, known as Unit 731, gave up the plan after being told by then top commanders of the Imperial Japanese Army, ''Don't die in vain,'' the researchers said.
He gained his PhD in 1974 after studying engineering in Birmingham and in 1993 left his wife to marry Dr Rihab Taha, a British-trained scientist known as 'Dr Chemical' after heading her country's germ warfare research programme.
The lawsuit was filed with the Tokyo District Court in 1997 and 1999 by 180 people -- victims and relatives of deceased victims of the Imperial Japanese Army's germ warfare -- demanding 10 million yen each in damages and an apology from the government.
The Department of Health yesterday announced it was buying enough vaccine to protect 16 million people in the event of a germ warfare attack.
The Department of Health yesterday announced that it was buying stocks of smallpox vaccine sufficient to protect 16 million people in the event of a germ warfare attack.
The ministry said it could not find any links between the bones and the Imperial Japanese Army's notorious germ warfare arm, known as Unit 731, which is known to have killed thousands of Chinese civilians and prisoners of war by conducting biological warfare experiments on them in northeastern China.
But what of the modem risk of bioterrorism and germ warfare, and the possible reappearance of a disease like smallpox, against which most modern-day Americans have not been adequately vaccinated?
WHEN WE SIGN A TREATY, WE'LL LIVE BY IT, WHETHER WE CARE ABOUT SAVING THE WORLD FROM GLOBAL WARMING AND GERM WARFARE OR NOT.
Yesterday America's under secretary of state for arms control, John Bolton, told a conference in Geneva the existence of a germ warfare programme in Iraq was "beyond dispute".
* On July 25, the United States rejected efforts to institute new global guidelines against germ warfare. The draft agreement--culminating six years of negotiations over ways to verify compliance with the Biological Weapons Convention, which has no monitoring procedures--would have strengthened the 1972 treaty ban on the development, production, and possession of biological weapons.
Curious to note, in your December issue page 54, that Joseph Needham `put his signature to a report which endorsed false accusations that the Americans had used germ warfare in Korea.'