geriatric nursing assistant


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geriatric nursing assistant

Abbreviation: GNA
An unlicensed caregiver who provides basic care needs, such as bathing and feeding, to residents in nursing homes or other health care facilities. According to federal regulations, GNAs must successfully complete at least a prescribed training course and register in the state in which they are practicing. Geriatric nursing assistants are a specially trained class of certified nursing assistants. See: nursing assistant
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We just joined the National Association of Geriatric Nursing Assistants. Friendship Village paid for membership for each of our CNAs.
One noteworthy program at Hillcrest was its training program for geriatric nursing assistants. Because the facility was having the age-old problem of finding well-trained staff, application was made to the Tennessee Employment Security for assistance, and funds for a training program became available through the Federal Manpower Development Training Act.
According to Savage, "The program, the first of its kind in the nation, [would] create a nursing level between that of a nurse's aide and a licensed practical nurse." [15] When successfully completed, the 20-week course (220 hours classroom theory and 540 of clinical training) conferred the title on its graduates as "Certified Geriatric Nursing Assistants."
First training program for geriatric nursing assistants (intended to create a level of nursing between a nurse's aide and a licensed practical nurse) approved, with funding coming from the Federal Manpower Development Training Act.
They're accomplishing in Missouri what some states are still just talking about: The Welcare program, sponsored by the National Association of Geriatric Nursing Assistants (NAGNA) and licensed by the state in January 1997, has been training welfare recipients for the long-term care workplace and providing successful job placement to its graduates since the NAGNA Training Institute opened its doors in March 1997.
Recently the National Association of Geriatric Nursing Assistants (NAGNA) had a brain-storm-a way to simultaneously get people off welfare and improve nursing home care by reducing the nurse aide shortage.

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