geotropism


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geotropism

 [je-ot´ro-pizm]
tropism in response to gravity, i.e., either toward or away from the earth; growth influenced by gravity.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ge·o·tax·is

(jē'ō-tak'sis),
A form of positive barotaxis in which there is a tendency to growth or movement toward or into the earth.
Synonym(s): geotropism
[geo- + G. taxis, orderly arrangement]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

geotropism

(jē-ŏt′rə-pĭz′əm)
ge′o·tro′pic (jē′ə-trō′pĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

geotropism

see GRAVITROPISM.

geotropism

) a plant growth movement that occurs in response to gravity. Thus roots are positively gravitropic (growing downwards), while shoots are generally negatively gravitropic (growing upwards).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This bending response to light is called phototropism, and other tropisms include a response to gravity (geotropism) and a response to touch (thigmotropism).
Radicles and secondary roots exhibit geotropism that causes them to grow downward, toward the center of the earth.
Auxins have been found responsible for phototropism, geotropism, and apical dominance.
When a cut flower such as a gladiolus or snapdragon (Antirrhinum) bends upward in response to the force of gravity, it is called geotropism, from the Greek words geo (earth) and trope (turning).
geotropism. Bending and curving upward against the force of gravity, exhibited by gladiolus and snapdragons.
(This technique [Miquel 1976] also takes advantage of the negative geotropism of D.
Roots on most desert plants, like those on relatives that grow where water is plentiful, exhibit positive geotropism; that is, they grow downward in response to gravity.