geophilic


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ge·o·phil·ic

(jē'ō-fil'ik),
Terrestrial, soil inhabiting.
[geo- + G. philos, love, attraction, + -ic]

ge·o·phil·ic

(jē'ō-fil'ik)
Soil-loving; refers to microorganisms indigenous to soil.
[geo- + G. philos, love, attraction, + -ic]
References in periodicals archive ?
Categories of dermatophytes include anthropophilic, zoophilic, and geophilic. Dermatophytes are aerobic, nonfastidious organisms that require moisture for growth.
Dermatophytes, which are ubiquitous in the environment, are categorized as geophilic, zoophilic, or anthropophilic according to their ecologic reservoir.
[3] Based on habitat (Source of the keratin used), they are classified as Geophilic (Organism originates from soil), Anthropophilic (organism originates from humans), Zoophilic (Organism originates from animals).
Rarely, it is also caused by geophilic and anthropophilic species.
Also in the present study a geophilic dermatophyte, M gypseum was isolated, which may be attributed to the contact of the patients with the soil.
Infections caused by these fungi are also known by the names "Tinea" and "Ringworm." It is important to emphasize that "ringworm" is not caused by a worm, but rather by a type of fungus called, Dermatophyte (2) There are three genera of dermatophytes-Trichophyton, Microsporum and Epidermophyton (3) Depending on their ecological characteristics, dermatophytes are described as anthropophilic, zoophilic or geophilic. The fungal species exclusively affecting humans are known as anthropophilic while those inhabiting with domestic and wild animals as well as birds are called zoophilic dermatophytes.
Dermatophytes have long been classified as anthropophilic, zoophilic and geophilic species on the basis of their primary habitat associations.