geologic disaster

geologic disaster

Public health A generic term for a natural disaster due to geological disturbances, often caused by shifts in tectonic plates and seismic activity Examples Earthquakes, tsunami, volcanic eruptions, avalanches. Cf Climatological disaster.
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Turning to the disaster variables, note that the coefficients on the climatic disaster variables are positive and statistically significant, whereas the coefficients on the geologic disaster variables are negative but statistically insignificant.
Although the potential hazards are abundant, we focus on climatic disasters and geologic disasters. In this study, we use two sources of data on natural disasters.
We also separate climatic from geologic disasters because the relative effects of each on the economic decisions may differ.
The climatic disaster variables are positively correlated with economic growth, whereas the historical geologic disasters are negatively associated with economic growth.
However, the negative and sometimes statistically significant relationship between economic growth and geologic disasters may be an indication that geologic disasters result in loss of life (human capital destruction) along with physical capital destruction so that the net effect on economic growth is negative.
Although our theoretical discussion suggests that the effects of disasters on the economy are generally ambiguous, the empirical analysis shows that while controlling for many factors, climatic disasters are positively correlated with economic growth, human capital investment, and growth in total factor productivity, whereas geologic disasters are negatively correlated with growth.
Geologic disasters include volcanic eruptions, natural explosions, avalanches, landslides, and earthquakes.
(15.) In estimates that are not presented but are available on request, we test climatic and geologic disasters separately.
The parameter estimate for geologic disasters is negative but not significant.
The results for the intensity of disasters (Tables 5 and 7) mirror those obtained with the cross-country sample, with lower elasticities in the response of R&D spillovers and no effect of geologic disasters. The same type of interaction with the level of development as in the cross-section estimations appears in all estimated models using the panel structure.
The effect of geologic disasters on technological transfer appears now highly significant when using frequency of disasters as an explanatory variable in the panel, as opposed to the pure cross-country results.
We also provide results for the intensity of climatic and geologic disasters. While the intensity of climatic disasters is a significant determinant of medium- and long-run patterns of technological transfer and is negatively related to the size of the spillover, the results for geologic disasters are only significant and very sizeable in the medium-run recovery following the occurrence of a disaster.