carcinogen

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Related to genotoxic carcinogen: genotoxin

carcinogen

 [kahr-sin´o-jen]
a substance that causes cancer. The Environmental Protection Agency of the U.S. Government has three descriptors for classifying human carcinogenic potential: “known/likely,” “cannot be determined,” and “not likely.”
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·cin·o·gen

(kar-sin'ō-jen, kar'si-nō-jen),
Any cancer-producing substance or organism, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or agents such as in certain types of irradiation.
[carcino- + G, -gen, producing]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

carcinogen

(kär-sĭn′ə-jən, kär′sə-nə-jĕn′)
n.
A cancer-causing substance or agent.

car′ci·no·gen′e·sis (kär′sə-nə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs) n.
car′cin·o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
car′ci·no·ge·nic′i·ty (-jə-nĭs′ĭ-tē) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

carcinogen

Oncology Any physical or chemical agent or substance which, when administered by an appropriate route, ↑ incidence of tumors when compared to unexposed control population. See Cocarcinogen, Complete carcinogen, Natural carcinogen, Proximal carcinogen.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

car·cin·o·gen

(kahr-sin'ŏ-jen)
Any cancer-producing substance or organism, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or agents such as certain types of irradiation.
[carcino- + G, -gen, producing]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

carcinogen

Any CANCER-producing agency.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

carcinogen

a substance which is a CANCER-causing agent.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Carcinogen

A substance that is known to cause cancer.
Mentioned in: Eye Cancer
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·cin·o·gen

(kahr-sin'ŏ-jen)
Any cancer-producing substance or organism.
[carcino- + G, -gen, producing]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, with exception of "inhibition of gap junction intercellular communication" and "inhibition of senescence through activation of telomerase," a number of the mechanisms/ endpoints listed are not specific to NGTxC: oxidative stress, increased mitogenesis, interference with tubulin polymerization and so on, are also mechanisms for genotoxic carcinogens, and where negative results are recorded in the mutagenicity/genotoxicity assays, these are acceptable for mutagenesis/genotoxicity regulatory purposes.
Nutrition-Associated Genotoxic Carcinogens, Heterocyclic Arylamines, as Risk Factors
The frequency of chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) measured with the conventional cytogenetic assay in metaphase cells has routinely been used for several decades as a tool to monitor occupational and environmental exposures to genotoxic carcinogens. There is ample evidence of the value of this biomarker for the identification of occupational and environmental hazards (Albertini et al.
These tumors are readily induced by many genotoxic carcinogens, but they may also be induced by virtually any nongenotoxic goitrogen in these rodent species.
Rapid induction of more malignant tumors by various genotoxic carcinogens in transgenic mice harboring a human prototype c-Ha-ras gene than in control non-transgenic mice.
To evaluate the prevalence of genotoxic carcinogens (39), we predicted the proportion of chemicals that would induce cancers in rodents and mutagenicity in Salmonella (i.e., genotoxic carcinogens).
This analysis confirms that genotoxic carcinogens are generally characterized by an ability to cause tumors in multiple species and at multiple sites (13, 14) whereas nongenotoxic agents tend to exhibit tissue- and species-specific carcinogenicity (Table 11) (4,13,15).
Anisimov (70) suggested that high rates of cell proliferation during periods of rapid growth could differentially predispose organs to genotoxic carcinogens. Thus, cellular proliferation in the male and female reproductive tracts that occurs during adolescence could increase susceptibility to toxicant-induced reproductive tract cancers.