geniohyoid


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Related to geniohyoid: mylohyoid, stylohyoid, sternothyroid, thyrohyoid

ge·ni·o·hy·oid (mus·cle)

[TA]
one of the suprahyoid muscles of the neck; origin, mental spine of mandible; insertion, body of hyoid bone; action, draws hyoid forward, or depresses jaw when hyoid is fixed; nerve supply, fibers from ventral primary rami of first and second cervical spinal nerves conveyed by the hypoglossal nerve.

geniohyoid

(jē′nē-ō-hī′oid′)
n.
A muscle that connects the mandible to the hyoid bone and draws the hyoid bone forward or depresses the jaw when the hyoid bone is fixed.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1925, Colp classified dermoid cysts according to their relationship with the surrounding muscles as sublingual beyond the geniohyoid muscle, geniohyoid between geniohyoid and mylohyoid muscles and lateral beneath the mylohyoid muscle [8, 9].
The geniohyoid is also visible from its posterior origin on the hypobranchial plate to its insertion on the infrarostral cartilages of the lower jaw.
They can be sublingual, geniohyoid and lateral (3).
Bu yolla agzin acilmasina katkida bulundugu dusunulen geniohyoid, digastrik ve mylohyoid kaslarin etkilendigi dusunulmektedir.
The genial tubercles also bear the attachments of the geniohyoid muscles, whereas the anterior bellies of the digastrics attach laterally along the posterior aspect of the mandibular symphysis.
An external incision was made between the mentum and the hyoid bone, and a pocket deep to the geniohyoid muscle was entered, yielding 40 ml of foul-smelling liquefied blood clot.
There are another three suprahyoid muscles: the geniohyoid, stylohyoid and mylohyoid, which are also inserted in the hyoid bone and, together with the digastric muscle, anchor this bone against the traction of the infrahyoid muscles (Lockhart et al.).
In the middle of the mouth, it attaches to the geniohyoid and mylohyoid muscles at the base of the mouth (see diagram).
Marked activity occurred in the anterior belly of the digastric and the mylohyoid muscle, followed by moderate activity of the geniohyoid muscle.
Another important group is that of the depressor muscles which have the basic function of opening the mouth, and contains lateral pterygoid, digastric muscles, mylohyoid and geniohyoid muscles.
Rarely, ranulas can dissect across the midline between the mylohyoid and geniohyoid muscles to present as a bilateral mass (Figure 9).
Normally, the diameter of the upper airway increases during inhalation and decreases during exhalation, The changes in upper airway diameter during respiration is thought to primarily result from increased activation (during inhalation) and decreased activation (during exhalation) of pharyngeal dilator muscles such as the geniohyoid, sternohyoid, genioglossus, and stylopharyngeus muscles.