genetic predisposition


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genetic predisposition

Molecular medicine The tendency to suffer from certain genetic diseases–eg, Huntington's disease, or inherit certain skills–eg, musical talent
References in periodicals archive ?
This analysis was designed to answer two questions: is physical activity and fitness associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events and what effect -- if any -- does genetic predisposition play in that equation.
It's fairly quick, painless and easy way to learn what genetic predispositions you may have.
But remember, just because you have a genetic predisposition to a disease doesn't mean you're guaranteed to develop it.
Conclusion The people suffering from melasma of Eastern sub-Himalayan region, have genetic predisposition especially in early onset disease.
One of the causes of obesity is a genetic predisposition, YE-zbaE-yoy-lu said.
London, United Kingdom, March 31, 2013 --(PR.com)-- Test Diagnostics introduces their genetic predisposition at home DNA testing kit.
In individuals with a genetic predisposition, trauma causes long-term changes in DNA methylation leading to a lasting dysregulation of the stress hormone system.
"Just as important, however," said Weilie, is "that we can show that alterations in the number of stem cells as a result of harmful substances take place only in children who have already been afflicted with skin manifestations." This leads to the conclusion: There is a relationship between the genetic predisposition for a disease and environmental influences --there are environmental and life style factors which determine whether a genetic predisposition is in fact realized or not.
These findings are the first stage in developing an easy and relatively inexpensive genetic test to help women determine whether they have a genetic predisposition to early menopause, bur the discriminative power is still limited.
The reason: a genetic predisposition makes it much easier and cheaper to detect among those with a Mennonite genetic background.
An omega-3 fat found in fish oil reduces the risk of precancerous intestinal polyps in people who have a genetic predisposition to get polyps and colon cancer.