genetic population


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genetic population

See deme.

genetic population

see POPULATION.

population

all of the animals in a specifically defined area considered as a whole. The population may also be defined in modes other than geography, e.g. the cow population, a species specification, the nocturnal bird population.

binomial population
see binomial population.
population cartogram
a map of populations.
case population
see case population.
closed population
e.g. closed herd or flock; a population into which no introductions are permitted, including artificial insemination or embryo transfer; the population is genetically and/or hygienically isolated.
comparison population
see comparison population.
contiguous p's
the populations are separated but have a common border. Some diseases are very difficult to restrain from spreading from one population to the next.
control population
see control population.
population density
see population density.
experimental population
the population in which the experiment, or trial, is being conducted.
finite population
one capable of total examination by census.
genetic population
see deme.
genetically defined population
one in which the ancestry of the animals in it is known.
population genetics
deals with the frequency of occurrence of inherited characteristics in a population.
infinite population
cannot be examined as a total population because they may never actually exist but are capable of statistical importance.
population limitation
restricting the growth of an animal population by desexing, by culling or by managemental means of interfering with reproduction.
population mean
the mean of the population.
population numbers
see population size (below).
open population
one in which immigration in and out is unrestrained.
parent population
the original population about which it is hoped to make some inferences by examination of a sample of its constituent members.
population proportion
the percentage of the population that has the subject characteristics.
population pyramid
a graphic presentation of the composition of a population with the largest group forming the baseline, the smallest at the apex.
population at risk
see risk population (below).
risk population
the population which is composed of animals that are exposed to the pathogenic agent under discussion and are inherently susceptible to it. Called also population at risk. High or special risk groups are those which have had more than average exposure to the pathogenic agent.
population size
actual counting of a total population, the census method, is not often possible in large animal populations. Alternatives are by various sampling techniques including area trapping, the trapping of all animals in an area, the capture-release-recapture method, the nearest neighbor and line transect methods,
The population size is expressed as the population present at a particular instant. Alternatively it can be expressed as an animal-duration expression when the population is a shifting one and it is desired to express the population size over a period (e.g. cow-day).
stable population
a population which has constant mortality and fertility rates, and no migration, therefore a fixed age distribution and constant growth rate.
target population
in epidemiological terms the population from which an experimenter wishes to draw an unbiased sample and make inferences about it.
References in periodicals archive ?
These results reinforce the finding that measuring functional connectivity across more than one landscape and at multiple geographic and temporal scales is necessary to test the relationship between measures of habitat fragmentation and genetic population structure (Keyghobadi, 2007).
Then a randomly generated genetic population and an empty archive are created.
Population structuring has been detected in neotropical freshwater long-distance migratory fish comprising different genetic populations within a single hydrographic system (Sivasundar et al.
Although they reported the presence of 3 distinct genetic populations along their northern coasts, their study was likely confounded by small sample sizes, lack of a temporal sampling design, and no corrections for multiple comparisons in their analyses as they were unable to identify any potential behavioral or geographic mechanisms of genetic isolation among detected groupings.
It is believed that two or more genetic populations of migratory fish can co-exist within a continuous hydrographic system (Hatanaka et al.
In a previous paper (Podolsky and Holtsford 1995), we provided evidence that historical selection had affected two continuous (IL1 and PW) and four discrete traits (WS, DB, SC, and Pub) based on differences in the quantitative genetic population structure as estimated by [F.
Previous studies indicated that microsatellites markers have great potential for resolving genetic population structure, and an understanding of genetic structure is vital for the management and conservation of cuttlefish resources (Zheng et al.
All these findings confirmed that the fat-tailed sheep population belongs to the genetic population with high polymorphism information content.
Evaluation of the genetic population structure both between and within broodlines in British Columbia and Washington form the basis of the current study.
We employed markers of both the nuclear (allozymes) and mitochondrial genomes to assess the population structure of these three species to test this predicted relationship between habitat continuity and genetic population structure.
Genetic population relationships were estimated by constructing an unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) tree based on Nei's standard genetic distance (Nei 1978).