genetic parent

The parent who conceived a child

genetic parent

Biological parent Social medicine A person who conceived a child, typically the biological parent of an adopted child
References in periodicals archive ?
However, every child has a right to identify their biological parents and it should be regarded that these children never submit a consent form for their everlasting anonymity, and most of them will try to find their genetic parent in the future.
Rachel wanted to be a genetic parent too, but after an egg-sharing process failed and she had a miscarriage, she had to accept this may never happen.
Rachel wanted to be a genetic parent too - but after an egg-sharing process failed and she had a miscarriage, she has had to accept this may never happen.
Historically, in child custody disputes involving same-sex couples who conceived their children through ART, the law only recognized the parent-child relationship between the child and the member of the same-sex couple who was the child's genetic parent. (7) Consequently, non-genetic parents in these situations were frequently denied standing to seek custody or visitation following the dissolution of their relationship with the child's genetic parent, even though the couple had decided together to bring the child into their family.
In family law, DNA can be used to identify with near certainty the genetic parent of a given child.
alive, in not being made a genetic parent after his death, and a dead
(125) The Court went on to reject the claim of the genetic father, Jonathan Lehr, whom it determined had failed to demonstrate "a full commitment to the responsibilities of parenthood by 'coming forward to participate in the rearing of his child.'" (126) The Court explained that the "most effective protection of the putative father's opportunity to develop a relationship with the child is provided by the laws that authorize formal marriage and govern its consequences," (127) but that this is not the only way to protect a genetic parent's parental claim, as Stanley had already demonstrated.
I love the story of Gouais Blanc, a prolific white grape that has been banned several times in France--and is banned today--because it's not considered of high quality, yet it's the genetic parent of Chardonnay and Riesling.
For that child, a child welfare justification will be possible, if he or she would be better off having access to the identity of his or her donor genetic parent. I call this type of situation an "imperfect" nonidentity problem.
* at least one intended parent is a genetic parent of the child; (74) and
But since donor anonymity was lifted in April 2005, by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, which now allows children conceived using donor sperm to trace their genetic parent through their donor register once they are 18.
The "Naked" Right Not to Be a Genetic Parent, Prior-Consent and