genetic

(redirected from genetic merit)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to genetic merit: genetic dictionary

genetic

 [jĕ-net´ik]
1. pertaining to reproduction or to birth or origin.
2. inherited.
genetic code the arrangement of nucleotides in the polynucleotide chain of a chromosome; it governs the transmission of genetic information to proteins, i.e., determines the sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide chain making up each protein synthesized by the cell. Genetic information is coded in DNA by means of four bases: two purines (adenine and guanine) and two pyrimidines (thymine and cystosine). Each adjacent sequence of three bases (a codon) determines the insertion of a specific amino acid. In RNA, uracil replaces thymine.
genetic map
1. the location of mutations along the length of a chromosome, as determined by recombination experiments. The unit of length is the centimorgan (cM), one crossover per meiosis.
2. the sequence of base pairs along the DNA of a chromosome, a technique being applied to humans.
A gene map of Chromosome 18. From Copstead, 1996.
genetic marker a gene having alleles that are all expressed in the phenotype, that is, they are codominant, and which can be used to study inheritance. The various blood group systems and serum or red blood cell proteins easily detected by electrophoresis or immunodiffusion are commonly used markers.

ge·net·ic

(jĕ-net'ik),
Pertaining to genetics; genetical.

genetic

/ge·net·ic/ (jĕ-net´ik)
1. pertaining to or determined by genes.
2. pertaining to reproduction or to birth or origin.

genetic

(jə-nĕt′ĭk) also

genetical

(-ĭ-kəl)
adj.
a. Of or relating to genetics or genes.
b. Affecting or determined by genes: genetic diseases.

ge·net′i·cal·ly adv.

genetic

[jənet′ik]
Etymology: Gk, genesis, origin
1 pertaining to reproduction, birth, or origin.
2 pertaining to genetics or heredity.
3 pertaining to or produced by a gene; inherited.

genetic

adjective Referring to genes; inherited.

ge·net·ic

(jĕ-net'ik)
Pertaining to genetics; genetical.

genetic

of or relating to genes.

Genetic

The term refers to genes, the basic units of biological heredity, which are contained on the chromosomes, and contain chemical instructions which direct the development and functioning of an individual.

genetic

1. pertaining to reproduction or to birth or origin.
2. inherited.

genetic abnormality
inherited defect, which may or may not be congenital.
genetic analysis
analysis of breeding and pedigree records to establish degrees of relationship between single animals and groups of animals. Segregation analysis with full-sibling families is an obvious technique.
genetic code
the manner in which the arrangement of nucleotides in the polynucleotide chain of a chromosome governs the transmission of genetic information to proteins, i.e. determines the sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide chain making up each protein synthesized by the cell. Genetic information is coded in DNA by means of four bases (two purines: adenine and guanine; and two pyrimidines: thymine and cystosine). Each adjacent sequence of three bases (a codon) determines which of the 20 amino acids will be inserted into the nascent polypeptide.
genetic complementation
genetic control of inherited disease
consists of preventing carrier animals from contributing their genes to succeeding generations of the population of which they are members.
genetic correlation
a change in an unselected character resulting from selection of another character during a breeding program.
genetic defects
defects of function or structure passed on from parents to offspring. Inherited defects.
genetic determination
see broad-sense heritability.
genetic disease resistance
inherited resistance to diseases caused by non-hereditary risk factors.
genetic dominance
see dominance (2).
genetic drift
see antigenic drift.
genetic engineering
the manipulation of genes by recombinant DNA technologies to produce chromosomal combinations that are unlikely to occur by natural means, for example the introduction of genes for insulin into a yeast cell which then produces insulin which can be purified and used as a therapeutic substance. See also recombinant DNA technology.
genetic etiology
disease caused by inheritance of specific disease without the intervention of other risk factors; established by strongly positive relationship in terms of genes held in common between the affected patient and other affected individuals.
genetic evaluation
assessment, for predictive purposes, of productive improvement or conformational characteristics, of the gain to be derived by the use of the animal in question in a breeding program.
genetic expressivity
genetic heterogeneity
demonstrated by the way in which more than one disease with identical clinical signs can be inherited.
genetic immunization
use of a cloned genetically engineered gene with an encoded antigen to immunize the host against that antigen. See also DNA vaccine.
genetic map
the linear arrangement of genes along a chromosome. Called also linkage map.
genetic merit
inherited productivity or performance qualities.
mobile genetic elements
see transposable genetic elements (below).
genetic penetrance
genetic production potential
inherited productivity but still influenced by environmental risk factors.
genetic resistance
genetically determined resistance to specified infectious agents.
genetic selection
selection of animals as breeding stock on the basis of known inherited characteristics.
transposable genetic elements
pieces of DNA varying in length from a few hundred to tens of thousands of base pairs found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells that move from place to place in the chromosomes of a single cell; some are viruses. Called also mobile genetic elements or transposons.
genetic variance
that portion of the phenotypic variance of a trait in a population which can be attributed to genetic difference amongst individuals.

Patient discussion about genetic

Q. Are there genetic factors involving allergies? My entire family suffers from different allergies. It is clear that there is a connection, is that true?

A. The risk of allergic sensitization and the development of allergies varies with age, with young children most at risk. It is known that there is a strong genetic relation and allergies are usually common among family members. Ethnicity may play a role in some allergies, however racial factors have been difficult to separate from environmental influences and changes due to migration.

Q. Is celiac genetic? I have one son with celiac disease from my first marriage and me second wife is now pregnant,I was wondering what are the chances for this soon to be born daughter of mine to have celiac as well- if I maybe carry the genetic flaw and is there a way to find out?

A. Celiac disease is a very common illness (about 1 in a 100 people suffer from it in different levels), and it is known to have a strong genetic connection. However, there is not one specific mutation that you can get genetic testing to see if you are carrying it. Your soon to be born daughter will have a higher chance than the regular population to suffer from the disease, but it does not necessarily mean she will.

Q. is Bipolar genetic?

A. Bipolar disorder has a very strong genetic background: The approximate lifetime risk of this disease in relatives of a bipolar patient is 40 to 70 percent for a monozygotic (identical) twin and 5 to 10 percent for a first degree relative, compared with 0.5 to 1.5 percent for an unrelated person.

More discussions about genetic
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the correct estimation of genetic parameters that guarantee for accurate prediction of genetic merit of an individual is essential.
the intensity of changes was greater in high genetic merit breeds (HF and cross-bred) dairy cows as compared to local low genetic merit breeds (Sahiwal and Achai) dairy cows, indicating that high genetic merit breeds are more sensitive to oxidative stress as compared to local low genetic merit breeds.
To that end, USDA's outreach goals include developing and transferring technology to assist producers in tasks such as using genome-based data to predict genetic merit of individual animals and developing precision management systems to promote animal production and health.
AIPL scientists have estimated the genetic merit of thousands of bulls and millions of cows from data collected since 1960 through an industry-wide dairy production testing and record-keeping system, and through breed registry societies.
However, with such a small percentage of stallions selected, and with only a few seasons for them to reveal their genetic merit, accurate assessment of stallions early in their breeding careers is of great importance.
Our proprietary cloning technologies are available commercially to enable those in animal agriculture to reproduce exact genetic replicas of their animals of high genetic merit," said Dr.
Consumers will get better food, because of the "increased genetic merit (of clones) for increased food production, disease resistance, and reproductive efficiency.
2] for individual primal-cuts showed by Choi et al [9] and our estimates, our study also indicated that predicting genetic merit for particular meat-cuts rather than gross meat-cut proportions i.
Major objectives of the mission are establishment of Gokul Gram, Field Performance recording, awarding farmers and institutes involved in the scientific rearing of Indigenous animals, strengthening Bull Mother farms, and inducting high genetic merit Bulls of Indigenous Breed into Semen Stations.
As many farmers know, he explained that the value of animals varies enormously according to factors such as breed, sex, age, bloodline and pedigree, genetic merit, stage of pregnancy and seasonality.
Identifying animals of high genetic merit is achieved by assessing the animals themselves and their relatives, in particular their offspring.