genetic marker


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genetic

 [jĕ-net´ik]
1. pertaining to reproduction or to birth or origin.
2. inherited.
genetic code the arrangement of nucleotides in the polynucleotide chain of a chromosome; it governs the transmission of genetic information to proteins, i.e., determines the sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide chain making up each protein synthesized by the cell. Genetic information is coded in DNA by means of four bases: two purines (adenine and guanine) and two pyrimidines (thymine and cystosine). Each adjacent sequence of three bases (a codon) determines the insertion of a specific amino acid. In RNA, uracil replaces thymine.
genetic map
1. the location of mutations along the length of a chromosome, as determined by recombination experiments. The unit of length is the centimorgan (cM), one crossover per meiosis.
2. the sequence of base pairs along the DNA of a chromosome, a technique being applied to humans.
A gene map of Chromosome 18. From Copstead, 1996.
genetic marker a gene having alleles that are all expressed in the phenotype, that is, they are codominant, and which can be used to study inheritance. The various blood group systems and serum or red blood cell proteins easily detected by electrophoresis or immunodiffusion are commonly used markers.

ge·net·ic de·ter·mi·nant

any antigenic determinant or identifying characteristic, particularly those of allotypes.
Synonym(s): genetic marker

genetic marker

n.
A gene, DNA sequence, or gene product whose inheritance can be traced through a pedigree or phylogeny. Genetic markers are used in paternity testing, studies of evolution, and evaluating genetic contributions to phenotypes including disease. Genetic markers associated with certain diseases can often be detected in the blood serum, where their presence is used to determine whether a person is at high risk for developing a disease.

genetic marker

any specific gene that produces a readily recognizable genetic trait that can be used in family and population studies or in linkage analysis. Also called gene marker, marker gene.

ge·net·ic de·ter·mi·nant

(jĕ-net'ik dĕ-tĕr'mi-nănt)
Any antigenic determinant or identifying characteristic, particularly those of allotypes.

genetic marker

A gene or DNA sequence that indicates the presence of a disease or a probable risk of developing it.

genetic marker

  1. a phenotypic character that can be assigned to a GENE to mark its position on the GENOME.
  2. a characteristic feature of the GENOTYPE, such as a NUCLEOTIDE signature, gene or HETEROCHROMATIC region, that can be used to track a particular individual, TISSUE, CELL, NUCLEUS, CHROMOSOME, PLASMID or gene. Genetic markers are used, for example, to detect the presence of cloning VECTORS in GENETIC ENGINEERING and to monitor ORGANISMS released into the environment. See RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM.

genetic marker,

n a specific gene that produces a readily recognizable genetic trait that can be used in family and population studies or in linkage analysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other people have asked whether the genetic markers evident in the Y chromosomes of the cohanim confer any special attributes upon the priests.
The study identified novel genetic markers in two genes: VAMP8, which is involved in platelet aggregation; and HNRPUL1, which encodes a ribonuclear protein.
The Xpert Carba-R Assay tests specimens directly taken from patients, which are usually obtained by rectal swabs, for the presence of five different genetic markers that are associated with carbapenemase, the enzyme produced by CRE.
The researchers found 18 genetic markers, 10 of which hadn't previously been linked to hair quality.
27 December 2013 - Researches from 38 separate institutions have discovered an additional 42 genetic markers associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics at The University of Manchester, one of the groups involved in the project, said on Wednesday.
These genetic markers may enable researchers to develop treatments based on the therapeutic targets to prevent the diseases from developing or progressing.
Patients who carried four or all five of these genetic markers had a 50 percent higher risk of dying from their prostate cancer than patients who had two or fewer.
He said: "Even a battery of 5-10 genetic markers for the disease is unlikely to be sufficient to tell the patient whether they will actually develop the disease, when they will develop it, or whether lifestyle changes could prevent them from developing it.
There are numerous scientific problems associated with any claim of ancestry using genetic markers.
Not surprisingly, as health care costs continue to increase and the costs of genetic testing decrease, employers may view genetic testing as a cost-saving technique by trying to weed out employees with genetic markers for disease.
Previously identified genetic markers indicate that in U.
This study, based on fingerprints obtained from eight polymorphic genetic markers, showed striking differences between the population structure of these species; a clonal C.