genetic isolation


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genetic isolation

a physiological form of ISOLATION in which hybrids from two different species are unable to produce fertile GAMETES and thus are sterile. For example, a horse crossed with a donkey produces a sterile mule.
References in periodicals archive ?
Originating in China more than 4,000 years ago, this breed suffered for 27 years in genetic isolation in three research facilities here in the United States.
Genetic isolation would have corresponded to geographical isolation.
Genetic analysis revealed three distinct genetic groups of walleyes in the river sections examined and genetic isolation impacts were evident in the most upstream reach examined.
Together with genetic isolation and other associated impacts, such fragmentation jeopardises the ecosystems ability to recover from or withstand other pressures.
ST]>0 indicating genetic isolation among regions (24) and supporting the geographic classification mentioned above.
Washington, Apr 19 ( ANI ): Recent research on the domestication of donkeys, camelids (which includes dromedaries, Bactrian camels, llamas and alpacas) pigs, cattle, sheep and goats suggests that neither intentional breeding nor genetic isolation were as significant as traditionally thought.
We are currently beginning an investigation of the degree of genetic isolation in fish inhabiting these systems.
Therefore, our findings of limited genetic isolation suggest high connectivity across the sampling area, which combined with the potentially long-term survival of prions in the environment (Brown & Gajdusek 1991, Seidel et al.
The objectives of this study were to use non-invasive sampling to examine whether the degree to which major roads and urban development surrounding habitat fragments can be used to predict the relative genetic isolation of bobcat populations in coastal southern California.
On the other side, our results indicated a genetic isolation and restricted gene flow Northern and Southern subspecies as well, occurred at least three million years ago.
This plant-pollinator monogamy maintains genetic isolation and prevents undesirable pollen from clogging up the works.
Although the co-habitation of all reproductives does not suggest nest budding in this case, genetic isolation of a subset of workers that maintain constant contact with less genetically differentiated individuals lends support to the hypothesis that physical or functional budding can occur without complete isolation from nestmates (Thorne et al.