genetic fitness

ge·net·ic fit·ness

in a phenotype, the mean number of surviving offspring that it generates in its lifetime, usually expressed as a fraction or percentage of the average genetic fitness of the population.

ge·net·ic fit·ness

(jĕ-net'ik fit'nĕs)
In a phenotype, the mean number of surviving offspring that it generates in its lifetime, usually expressed as a fraction or percentage of the average genetic fitness of the population.
References in periodicals archive ?
Heritability is used as the ratio of genetics fitness variance to total fitness variance (environmental variance plus genetic fitness variance).
LINKS TO LONGEVITY Why these late-acting mutations might lower a person's genetic fitness " their ability to reproduce and spread their genes " remains an open question.
Manning said that body symmetry is believed to be a sign of overall genetic fitness and good physical development, asserting that it has also been correlated with a wide range of attributes including running speed.
The signals kissing provides may provide biological cues for compatibility, genetic fitness, or general health, scientists believe.
He uses Salter's (2004) analysis of genetic similarity coefficients to demonstrate that ethnic nepotism makes sense in terms of genetic fitness and that ethnic groups are, in relation to each other, effectively extended families, implying that ethnic nepotism is simply an extension of nepotism.
In the wild, we will also be able to use the same tools to monitor the genetic fitness of snook populations there as well."
The assumption is that champion trees are genetically superior and cloning them will increase the genetic fitness of future forests.
has a disproportionately larger negative impact compared with an equal amount of increase in resources because the decrease is more likely to cause the organism to die (2) and thereby permanently forgo the possibility of producing offspring in the future that will contribute to its genetic fitness. This intuition is similar to results in models of financial distress and bankruptcy in which firms with large amounts of intangible assets that might disappear in bankruptcy will tend to avoid financial distress by avoiding risky outcomes and by hedging.
However to conserve Caspian brown trout is difficult to be achieved, because there is still impact on the genetic fitness of the wild population, and less success to minimize the impact while still maintaining a fishery of rare fish are observed.
"We know that genetic fitness increases with increased heterozygosity, so it stands to reason that certain areas (called loci) on some chromosomes would remain heterozygous if they have important effects on fitness.
The offspring make mate choices which maximize their own fitness, but because the two parties are not genetically identical these choices do not necessarily maximize the genetic fitness of their parents.
In the culture of nonnative species, competition and hybridization with native species are potential impacts, whereas in the culture of native species, reduction of the genetic fitness of wild populations through introgression with aquaculture strains is a primary concern (Utter & Epifanio 2002).