genetic exceptionalism


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genetic exceptionalism

The unique privacy protections given by law to test results that identify genetic traits or diseases in an individual. The granting of special privacy status to genetic test results as opposed to other health care information is felt by some legal scholars to be necessary to avoid potential discrimination against the bearers of some genetic traits or illnesses.
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critique the notion of genetic exceptionalism, contending that there is
Such privacy regulations will needlessly reinforce unscientific notions of genetic exceptionalism among the public.
Does genetic exceptionalism advice extend the patient's zone of privacy to include potentially affected relatives?
Also, Martin, Hopkins, Nightingale, and Kraft show in their empirical analysis of pharmaceutical and genomic companies that genomics has had far less effect on pharmaceutical practices than originally expected, making an important contribution to the argument against genetic exceptionalism.
(34.) Thomas Murphy introduces the idea that genetic information is qualitatively different from other forms of medical information and therefore warrants special protection, commonly referred to as "genetic exceptionalism." See Thomas H.
In the short term, emphasizing the power of genes to shape our lives might make "genetic exceptionalism"--the notion that we should treat genetic information differently from other kinds of information about persons--seem more plausible.
genetic exceptionalism became prevalent in legislative and policy
This perceived distinction between genetic information (8) and general medical information, has given rise to the movement of genetic exceptionalism, (9) which has lead to a feeling that current rules protecting its confidentially are inadequate and heightened protection for genetic information (10) is needed to subdue the fears of repeated discrimination (11) and eugenic abuses.
Therein, genetic information is being considered as part of the entire spectrum of all health information and not a separate category as such, in the sense of genetic exceptionalism. Importantly, the European Union (EU) recommendations state that quality assurance and the standardization of test development and usage must be considered ethical issues of genetic testing within healthcare systems [recommendations 7 and 17 (1)].
This singling out of genetic information for special protection seems to indicate an exceptionally powerful amount or type of knowledge--hence, genetic exceptionalism. A similar concern would arise regarding neuroscientific information.
Murray so argues in "Genetic Exceptionalism and `Future Diaries': Is Genetic Information Different from Other Medical Information?" in Genetic Secrets 60-73.
It is argued that the GenDG is an overly extreme attempt to control German citizens' access to and use of their own genetic information and is based too heavily on the idea of "genetic exceptionalism." (133) Others argue that the prohibition of employee genetic testing may harm German companies in the international market and may be detrimental to insurance companies.