genetic epidemiology

genetic epidemiology

the branch of epidemiology that studies the role of genetic factors and their interactions with environmental factors in the occurrence of disease in various populations.

ge·net·ic ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

(jĕ-net'ik ep'i-dē-mē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The branch of epidemiology that studies the role of genetic factors and their interactions with environmental factors in the occurrence of disease in various populations.

genetic epidemiology

An epidemiological discipline concerned with the familial and genetic determinants of disease and the contribution of genetics to the aetiology of disease. Appropriate weight is given to the biology underlying the action of genes and to the known mechanisms of inheritance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regan, M.D., from National Jewish Health in Denver, and colleagues studied 4,078 COPD Genetic Epidemiology (COPDGene) study participants who met criteria for LCS at enrollment.
The study, led by Tim Spector, Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at King's College London and author of The Diet Myth, followed 1,100 UK and US adults -- 60 per cent of whom were twins -- for a period of two weeks and examined blood markers such as blood sugar, insulin and triglycerides.
'Mendelian randomization': can genetic epidemiology contribute to understanding environmental determinants of disease?
Roeder, "Pleiotropy and principal components of heritability combine to increase power for association analysis," Genetic Epidemiology, vol.
Anthony Moorman, a Professor of Genetic Epidemiology, who co-leads the Leukaemia Research Cytogenet-ics Group at Newcastle University, said: "Risk stratification is a key component of improving survival rates and reducing side-effects for children with leukaemia.
Anthony Moorman, a Professor of Genetic Epidemiology, who coleads the Leukaemia Research Cytogenetics Group at Newcastle University, said: "This study indicates that using a traditional MRD threshold to assign patients to different treatment groups should be refined with the integration of detailed genetic testing, to more accurately identify children with a lower or higher risk of relapse.
Tim Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at King's College London, and part of the GlycanAge team, says: "We have been studying ageing in twins for 20 years and studying many different markers and predictors of age and biological age.
Anthony Moorman, professor of genetic epidemiology, who co-leads the Leukaemia Research Cytogenetics Group at Newcastle University, said: "Current methods used to guide treatment for relapsed leukaemia are not accurate enough, with some children believed to have a good chance of survival actually responding very poorly to chemotherapy.
[3] Research in genetic epidemiology has shown that many mental illnesses--including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autism spectrum disorder--have high rates of heritability.
Tim Spector, professor of genetic epidemiology at King's College London is clear about the damage we do with too much cleanliness.
The fourteen contributions that make up the main body of the text are devoted to searching for gene-gene and gene environmental interactions in genetic epidemiology, the molecular nature of post-zygotic reproductive isolation, and a wide variety of other related subjects.