genetic background

genetic background

  1. any genes other than those of special interest in a study.
  2. any effects in an experiment which can alter the main results in different crosses.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The highest MET B[C.sub.3][S.sub.2] and B[C.sub.4][S.sub.1] lines within each genetic background were crossed with the highest MET B[C.sub.3][S.sub.2] and B[C.sub.4][S.sub.1] lines from each of the other two genetic backgrounds.
Applicants are encouraged to consider the complexity of issues surrounding the meaning and assessment of race and ethnicity, because an individual's identification with a particular racial or ethnic group may involve not only an individual's genetic background but also his or her cultural and geographical identity.
The clinical importance and genetic background of these strains need to be elucidated.
Remy Burcelin's research spent three months studying how a fatty diet affected the gut flora of male mice of the same age, all with the same genetic background.
A gene is therefore placed into a new genetic background to which--during evolution--it has not been exposed, nor has the genetic background been exposed to this gene.
He and his co-workers say the most severe forms of depression may first appear during children and are strongly influenced by a child's genetic background.
In order to study the genetic background of schizophrenia, the frequency of particular risk genes between healthy and ill people has mostly been compared until now.
CZ25-9 has a substantially different genetic background than lines traditionally released from the Salinas program (Lewellen, 1992).
We will continue using this unique research resource in our further studies to decipher the genetic background of human hypertension," he added.