generalization

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generalization

 [jen″er-al-ĭ-za´shun]
the formation of a general principle or idea; inductive reasoning.
generalization of learning the application of previously learned concepts and behaviors to similar situations, a cognitive performance component of occupational therapy.

gen·er·al·i·za·tion

(jen'ĕr-ăl-i-zā'shŭn),
1. Rendering or becoming general, diffuse, or widespread, as when a primarily local disease becomes systemic.
2. The reasoning by which a basic conclusion is reached, which applies to different items, each having some common factor.

gen·er·al·i·za·tion

(jen'ĕr-ăl-ī-zā'shŭn)
1. Rendering or becoming general, diffuse, or widespread, as when a primarily local disease becomes systemic.
2. The reasoning by which a basic conclusion is reached, which applies to different items, each having some common factor.
3. Categorization that obscures differences between people or situations (e.g., age categories).
Synonym(s): generalisation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the complexity and variety of practitioners' generalisations, closing the gap will not happen quickly.
Practitioners use at least three types of generalisation. The first comprises accepted truths based on established and reliable concepts.
Luckily, most writing has moved on from using generalisations, apart from this column.
That film is thick with generalisations, the problem is they don't really apply to poker any more.
A measure of the impact of their work may well be the extent to which the limited generalisations that they have made can be shown not to hold over the next few years.
Lee Cronbach (1975) wrote the only generalisation I have ever encountered in social science that I am confident will still stand unchallenged in a hundred years' time.
For example the teacher may want the students to be familiar with the generalisation 'When a word ends in a consonant + y, change the 'y' to an 'I' and add 'es' when making the word plural'.
The teacher may then record the students' observations on the board and gradually a spelling generalisation can be arrived at.
Whilst Bob's generalisations and prejudices are not racist, I feel that they will encourage others to direct prejudice in other less trivial directions.
Also, the initial step in the operational definition: that is, about the areas that should be scrutinised for empirical generalisations, could be addressed using the method suggested by Eliashberg, Lilian & Kim (1995).
There is a second reason for being sceptical about a justification for a theoretical framework that rests solely upon the accessibility of additional generalisations. Arguably, an inescapable feature of all such frameworks, other than, perhaps, the level of physical implementation, is that the generalisations hold ceteris paribus, or, maybe, given certain definite qualifications.

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