generalisability


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generalisability

The extent to which the findings of a clinical trial can be reliably extrapolated from the subjects who participated in the trial to a broader patient population and a broader range of clinical settings.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rees, "Assessment of generalisability in trials of health interventions: suggested framework and systematic review," British Medical Journal, vol.
Clearly, the duration of each site visit limited the number of visitor interviews conducted, and we readily acknowledge that 60 interviews, even though recruited at random during site visits, limits the generalisability of visitors' responses to all those possible at any zoo.
A thorough description of sample demographics was given and a wide range of wrist and hand conditions were included in the sample ensuring good generalisability of the results.
The reason for his turn to these largely neglected theorists is in the name of asserting not so much totalities (which is the flaw in both Agamben and Foucault) but the fundamental generalisability of their combined projects.
First, the relatively small sample size may not be representative of entrepreneurship Iranian organizations, and thus generalisability of findings is limited.
Public service motivation and job satisfaction in China: An investigation of generalisability and instrumentality.
The inclusion of numerous surgical techniques restricts the generalisability of the results to any specific technique as it is likely that the outcomes following each method differ.
Thirdly, the strict inclusion criteria of patients with severe sepsis in this study limit generalisability of the finding to other patient groups in the ICU.
By excluding those patients who suffered a stroke and/or those with severe cognitive impaired group, we diminished the generalisability of our findings.
The study is a pragmatic controlled trial in the sense that interventions were delivered in a routine general adult psychiatric setting so as to maximize generalisability of its results.
Indeed, there is considerable research support for this three-component conceptualisation of organisational commitment (Cichy, Cha, & Kim, 2009) and its generalisability across cultures (e.g.
Generalisability of The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database: demographics, chronic disease prevalence and mortality rates.
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