gene p53


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gene p53

A gene thought to be important in controlling the cell cycle, DNA repair and synthesis, and programmed cell death (apoptosis). Mutations of p53 have occurred in almost half of all types of cancer, arising from a variety of tissues. Mutant types may promote cancer. The normal, wild-type gene produces a protein important in tumor suppression.
See also: gene
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Mutations of tumor suppressor gene P53 (TP53) in tumor tissue and cellular urine sediments in urinary bladder cancer.
For example, the tumor-suppressor gene p53 is controlled by just a few motifs that combine to make p53 behave much like a ticking time bomb.
According to the hospital, the doctors directly injected into the man's throat the cancer-curbing gene P53 incorporated in nontoxic adenovirus vectors.
In a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology(2000;183:39-45), the investigators found that the test could be used to identify human papillomavirus E6 and the tumor suppressor gene p53, both of which are linked to the development of cervical cancer.
Patients whose tumors are made up of nondiploid cells and who have abnormal, elevated expression of the tumor-suppressor gene p53 have a markedly worse outlook than patients with diploid cells and normal p53, he said at the combined annual meetings of the Central Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
The team suspected that variations in a gene pathway controlled by the tumor suppressor gene p53 could have both positive and negative effects on human health.
There has been much research on the tumour suppressor gene p53. The p53 protein blocks cell division at the G1 to S boundary, stimulates DNA repair after DNA damage, and also induces apoptosis.
Four years ago, we started to profile molecular markers genes for cancer patients and at the beginning with the oncogene tumor suppressor gene P53, whose critical role is evident by the fact that it is mutated in approximately 50% to 70% of all human cancer.
For many years, scientists weren't sure how this substance worked, but Fung-Lung Chung and colleagues showed in experiments that the tumor suppressor gene p53 appears to play a key role in keeping cells healthy and preventing them from mutating into cancer cells.
Inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 is a well-established molecular event in the pathogenesis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.