gene frequency


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gene fre·quen·cy

1. the probability that a gene picked at random from a defined population is of a particular type;
2. epidemiologically, the proportion of genes in a population that are of the particular type;
3. statistically, the estimate of either of the foregoing two quantities.

gene frequency

n.
The frequency of occurrence of an allele in relation to that of other alleles of the same gene in a population.

allele frequency

A term used in population genetics for the number of copies of a particular allele divided by the number of copies of all alleles at that specific genetic locus in a population of interest. Allele frequency is a measure of a population’s genetic diversity: the higher the allele frequency, the greater the population’s consanguinity.

gene frequency

The number of occurrences of a particular gene in a population.

gene frequency

see ALLELE FREQUENCY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Families of thalassemia patients also show very high gene frequency. Studies show that in Pakistan carrier rate in these families vary between 31 - 68% in comparison to 5% in general population.
When gene frequency for the first allele at each locus is low in the initial population, the response to selection for yield is greater in the first five to six cycles, after which the response slows down (Fig.
(3) The very rare allele 4 (gene frequency < 0.01) uniquely expresses 2531T, which defines the [Sit.sup.a] alloantigen.
For a given gene frequency, the degree of the downward bias is partly dependent on the sampling of different subdivisions and individuals within subdivisions For balanced data from r random mating populations of size n (i.e., one-level hierarchy), the expected bias of estimated intraclass correlation [Mathematical Expression Omitted] is approximated by (cf.
The syndrome is due to an autosomal recessive gene with a gene frequency of 15 per 1000 population.
Mutation (G) gene frequency is 50% and the wild gene (A) frequency is 50%.
Statistical analysis: Pearson chi-square ([chi square]) test was performed to find the statistical significance between the genotypes, and the gene frequency was calculated by allele counting.
Estimating the prevalence of pyruvate kinase deficiency from the gene frequency in the general white population.
Each germplasm population, in the B[C.sub.2][F.sub.3] generation, is expected to have a resistant gene frequency of approximately 50%.
The gene frequency for the A allele was 27.1%, which is similar to that described by other studies (2).
Quantification of the amount of temporal gene frequency shifts over extended periods of time is of interest for understanding the dynamics of genetic change in natural populations and because it also provides a means for estimation of the genetically effective population size, [N.sub.e].
If trapping bias exists, empirical estimates of gene frequency could be seriously affected.