gender

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gender

 [jen´der]
sex (def. 1); see also gender identity and gender role.
gender identity disorder a disturbance of gender identification in which the affected person has an overwhelming desire to change their anatomic sex or insists that they are of the opposite sex, with persistent discomfort about their assigned sex or about filling its usual gender role; the disorder may become apparent in childhood or not appear until adolescence or adulthood. Individuals may attempt to live as members of the opposite sex and may seek hormonal and surgical treatment to bring their anatomy into conformity with their belief (see transsexualism). It is not the same as transvestism.

gen·der

(jen'dĕr),
Category to which an individual is assigned by self or others, on the basis of sex. Compare: sex, gender role.

gender

(jĕn′dər)
n.
1. Grammar
a. A grammatical category, often designated as male, female, or neuter, used in the classification of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and, in some languages, verbs that may be arbitrary or based on characteristics such as sex or animacy and that determines agreement with or selection of modifiers, referents, or grammatical forms.
b. The fact of being classified as belonging to such a category: agreement in gender, number, and case.
2.
a. Either of the two divisions, designated female and male, by which most organisms are classified on the basis of their reproductive organs and functions; sex.
b. One's identity as female or male or as neither entirely female nor entirely male.
c. Females or males considered as a group: Students lined up with the genders in different lines.
tr.v. gen·dered, gen·dering, gen·ders Archaic
To engender.

gen′der·less adj.

gender

The sex with which a person identifies him- or herself.

gender

Sex; one's personal, social, and legal status as ♂ or ♀, based on body and behavior, not on genital and/or erotic criteria. See Gender-identity/role.

gen·der

(jen'dĕr)
Category to which a person is assigned by self or others, on the basis of sex.
Compare: sex, gender role
[fr. L. genus, kind]

gender

A classification of organisms based on their sex. From the Latin genus , a kind.

Patient discussion about gender

Q. In which month of pregnancy it's possible to determine gender of the fetus?

A. following marin's question - is there a difference when it comes to twins?

Q. Which gender is on the high risk of fibromyalgia and what may be the cause?

A. It’s generally found with women. Any women having family history of fibromyalgia is more likely to suffer from fibromyalgia. Causes are unknown. Factors known to cause are that some people with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and spinal arthritis may be more likely to have fibromyalgia, too. Researchers suspect that some genes may stimulate pain in patients with fibromyalgia though there is no proof to that effect.

More discussions about gender
References in periodicals archive ?
Four articles argue that in order to be successful environmental conservation programs such as REDD+ [Reduction in Emissions from Deforestation and Land Degradation+] must consider gendered power structures, particularly related to resource access and governance (Khadka et al.
Were they shaped by the gendered inequalities found in sports?
The Gendered Propensity of Organizational Structures and Mechanisms
Rosalind Smith argues for a similar recognition of engagement between female- and male-authored texts in her study of Anne Lock's Miserere mei Deus, where she discusses problems of attribution (not solved by Lock's disclaimer) and its possible influence on our reading of the text as gendered. She also underlines Lock's achievement in using the sonnet form for meditations.
In a particularly provocative chapter on sexuality entitled "How Many Opposites," Lorber introduces the concept of "gendered sexual statuses" to articulate the categorization of both gender and sexuality in modern Western cultures that results in the recognition of only four possibilities: heterosexual man, heterosexual woman, gay man and lesbian.
The overall results provide strong evidence for the nature of gender stratification, the contrasting impacts of women's employment on their economic wellbeing in the liberal and social-democratic regimes, substantive change in gender roles and power relations, the protected labor markets of social-democratic welfare regimes women, and the gendered division of labor.
Only recently have men as men--that is, as gendered agents, with beliefs, behaviors, and characteristics associated with but not dependent upon biological sex--become subjects of theory and empirical investigation within the social sciences (Connell, 1987, 1995; Seidler, 1994), including in anthropology (Bourgois, 1995; Gutmann, 1997; Lancaster, 1992).
It is quite interesting that neither Bulwer nor Valerian claim that women with facial hair are masculine or even unfeminine, instead, they claim that these women are "monsters." This particular formulation indicates that sex/gender interpellation is such a crucial part of subjectification that in the case of abjected beings who do not appear "properly" gendered, it is not their gender but their very humanity that is called into question.
Kabeer argues that there may be a gendered pattern to labor market behaviour.
Such a gendered analysis of aid reform processes is of paramount importance as changes in gender and development policies have always largely been influenced by shifts in general aid and development policies.
In some cases women are left out of the decision-making process precisely because of gendered hierarchies of power in the home community.
While this study sets out to show the whys and hows of the ideologies of race and gender in African American literary texts, it soon collapses into a study that simply shows that African American literature is racialized--and gendered. I suppose I can imagine a context in which this point needs to be argued, but within African American literary scholarship it seems a given.