gemmule


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gemmule

 [jem´ūl]
1. a reproductive bud, the immediate product of gemmation.
2. any of the little spinelike processes on the dendrites of a nerve cell.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

gem·mule

(jem'yūl),
1. A small bud that projects from the parent cell, and finally becomes detached, forming a cell of a new generation.
2. Synonym(s): dendritic spines
[L. gemmula, dim. of gemma, bud]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gemmule

(jĕm′yo͞ol)
n.
1. A small gemma or similar structure, especially a reproductive structure in certain sponges that remains dormant for some time and later develops into a new individual.
2. A hypothetical particle in the theory of pangenesis, postulated to be produced by cells and to be responsible for transmitting traits from parent to offspring.

gem′mu·lif′er·ous (jĕm′yo͞o-lĭf′ər-əs) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

gem·mule

(jem'yūl)
1. A small bud that projects from the parent cell, and finally becomes detached, forming a cell of a new generation.
2. Synonym(s): dendritic spines.
[L. gemmula, dim. of gemma, bud]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

gemmule

a bud formed in sponges as an internal group of cells that gives rise to a new sponge after overwintering (in freshwater forms) and the decay of the parent.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
5.--SEM photos (A) Heteromeyenia tubisperma, gemmuloscleres, (B) Heteromeyenia tubisperma, microsclere, (C) Heteromeyenia tubisperma, megasclere, (D) Heteromeyenia tubisperma, gemmule, (E) Heteromeyenia latitenta, gemmulosclere, (F) Heteromeyenia latitenta, microsclere, (G) Heteromeyenia latitenta, macrosclere, (H) Heteromeyenia latitenta, gemmule
3.--SEM photos (A) Ephydatia fluvialilis, gemmulosclere, (B) Ephydatia fluvialilis, megasclere, (C) Ephydatia fluvialilis, gemmule, (D) Ephydatia muelleri, gemmulosclere, (E) Ephydatia muelleri, smooth megasclere, (F) Ephydatia muelleri, spiny megasclere, (G) Ephydatia muelleri, geminule
Sorbitol levels determined by sorbitol dehydrogenase and expressed as micromoles per gram of fresh gemmule tissue ([micro]mol/gfw) declined rapidly in germinating gemmules - from a maximum of about 36 [micro]mol/gfw to a steady-state level of about 4 [micro]mol/gfw by 36 h [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2 OMITTED].
Metabolism of gemmules from the freshwater sponge Eunapius fragilis during diapause and post-diapause.
Final determination of genus depends upon microscopic visualization of megascleres, microscleres, gemmules, and gemmoscleres.
Darwin suggested that the gemmules were physical entities and that, as such, other scientists could look for them or for their effects.
Volkmer-Ribeiro (1992) mentions the abundant presence of gemmules in all the collected sponge specimens, in this seasonal environment.
Role of cAMP in the release from dormancy of freshwater sponge gemmules. Dev.
There is no evidence that anyone again attempted an experiment to determine the veracity of pangenesis and its messenger gemmules. As is often the case in science, if an idea seems to work, that is evidence enough to the proponents that the idea might actually be the truth.
aspinosa was tentative, as gemmules are required for positive confirmation; and we could not find any.
Considering the above-mentioned factors, the HPS lakes situated in tropical and sub-tropical areas of South America seem to offer an ideal situation for tests about the cultivation of freshwater sponges, with the dual aim of further investigating their industrial application and develop management methods to reduce encrustations in pipes and turbines in HPSs, using either gemmules imported from upstream or produced in the reservoir itself.
"Winter-hardy seeds" was in the first version I read--and liked, so it found its way into my introduction--but the phrase was revised in the second version to "gemmules." Here is an excerpt from Susanna Nied's correspondence with me on this point: ...